Bury Hospice to get £124,000 cash lifeline from health bosses

Bury Hospice

Bury Hospice

First published in News This Is Lancashire: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

HEALTH bosses are to throw Bury Hospice a £124,000 lifeline to ease a cash crisis, it has been announced.

It will pay for six overnight beds and day-care services at the hospice until the end of next March, and will also help fund the Hospice at Home respite service.

The CCG’s chief officer Stuart North, making the announcement yesterday, said: “We acknowledge the vital services provided by the hospice to local people and their families. We also recognise the financial difficulties it faces.”

Last month, hospice trustees said the Rochdale Old Road facility was not raising the £3 million a year it needed to pay bills. Amid fears the hospice’s future could be under threat, more than 2,500 supporters have signed an online petition called Save Bury Hospice.

Trustees asked Bury’s NHS Clinical Commiss- ioning Group (CCG) for extra funds on top of the £305,000 it already receives from the NHS.

At a meeting yesterday lunchtime (Wed Aug 6), the CCG’s Clinical Cabinet decided to give the hospice another £124,000.

A condition of the deal is that the CCG’s auditors are able to review the hospice’s governance arrangements to check the books are being balanced as effectively as possible.

It is understood that the Clinical Cabinet could not hand over a higher amount as the CCG is currently facing its own underfunding dilemma.

The CCG’s chief officer Stuart North said: “The hospice has looked to us for additional financial support and put forward a number of options which have been considered in detail by our Clinical Cabinet.

“After consideration of the options, the CCG believes that as a minimum, the hospice should continue to maintain the provision of six overnight beds, day-care services and the Hospice at Home service.”

He added: “We acknowledge the vital services provided by the hospice to local people and their families. We also recognise the financial difficulties it faces.”

While the money will only address the hospice’s short-term money worries, the CCG is also aiming to deal with the long-term issue.

Its clinicians are reviewing how end-of-life care is provided throughout Bury.

When the review concludes this winter, changes could be made which lead to the CCG giving the hospice more cash annually than it does now.

Mr North added: “It is anticipated that elements of the (end-of-life) service currently provided by Bury Hospice will feature in this re-designed service.”

Comments (14)

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8:45pm Thu 7 Aug 14

Babbar Divino says...

This, of course, is good news however for the Hospice to survive long term it still needs support from the local community. Unfortunately the local community have lost confidence in the current management.
This, of course, is good news however for the Hospice to survive long term it still needs support from the local community. Unfortunately the local community have lost confidence in the current management. Babbar Divino
  • Score: 20

6:21pm Fri 8 Aug 14

White Admiral says...

Well indeed, what are the NHS Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) playing at? Are they are only interested in the bottom line? ... as it affects them? What about the serious allegations already brought into the public area via the comments section on the Bury Times Website such as:
- bullying culture;
- lack of staff support;
- Nurses behind on mandatory training;
- the future down grading of experienced staff to a training level band five grade;
- lack of trade Union recognition and with this effective representation;
- inappropriate use of agency staff;
- No AGM;
- Serious issues regarding the suitability of the manager and her past history;
- donations taken with out receipts and a clear definition of the "common pot" where all the money goes?

Those nurses who spoke out about the conditions took a chance. Remember the Senior Mental Health Nurse Karen Reissmann, who was sacked for gross misconduct for speaking out against cuts in the NHS! Whistle blowing requires a commitment to the patients and a lot of courage, yet Bury Hospice and the NHS chose to brush most of the issues under the carpet, now leaving the whistle blowers vulnerable to the excesses of the bullies that remain in place.

I am not even sure that the extra money with few strings attached is going to help in the long term, just pro-long the agony of those working for the hospice and create a vicarious feeling of the plight of the staff amongst the patients.

It is important that the people of bury react and force the resignation of the trustees and the manager.
Well indeed, what are the NHS Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) playing at? Are they are only interested in the bottom line? ... as it affects them? What about the serious allegations already brought into the public area via the comments section on the Bury Times Website such as: - bullying culture; - lack of staff support; - Nurses behind on mandatory training; - the future down grading of experienced staff to a training level band five grade; - lack of trade Union recognition and with this effective representation; - inappropriate use of agency staff; - No AGM; - Serious issues regarding the suitability of the manager and her past history; - donations taken with out receipts and a clear definition of the "common pot" where all the money goes? Those nurses who spoke out about the conditions took a chance. Remember the Senior Mental Health Nurse Karen Reissmann, who was sacked for gross misconduct for speaking out against cuts in the NHS! Whistle blowing requires a commitment to the patients and a lot of courage, yet Bury Hospice and the NHS chose to brush most of the issues under the carpet, now leaving the whistle blowers vulnerable to the excesses of the bullies that remain in place. I am not even sure that the extra money with few strings attached is going to help in the long term, just pro-long the agony of those working for the hospice and create a vicarious feeling of the plight of the staff amongst the patients. It is important that the people of bury react and force the resignation of the trustees and the manager. White Admiral
  • Score: 22

9:18pm Fri 8 Aug 14

Aletheia1978 says...

“After consideration of the options, the CCG believes that as a minimum, the hospice should continue to maintain the provision of six overnight beds, day-care services and the Hospice at Home service.”

In the above statement, the word 'minimum', is in the wrong place.

Does the CCG believe that the hospice cutting day-care to ONE day a week is maintaining provision of the service?
“After consideration of the options, the CCG believes that as a minimum, the hospice should continue to maintain the provision of six overnight beds, day-care services and the Hospice at Home service.” In the above statement, the word 'minimum', is in the wrong place. Does the CCG believe that the hospice cutting day-care to ONE day a week is maintaining provision of the service? Aletheia1978
  • Score: 16

8:18pm Sun 10 Aug 14

Aviator123 says...

Some further cash - but still at a terrible cost to patients and staff. No change to the In-patient unit beds as they currently have 5 open. For a very short period last year they opened to 9, but have predominantly run on 5 - 6 the whole time the new building has been open. Day Services have always operated over 3 days a week at both hospices, with places for 8 - 10 patients on each of those days. There are approx 10 patients on the waiting list at the moment. This service is being cut to just one day a week! The patients are poorly and really value this service, as do their families. With only 9 comfy chairs, it may be difficult now to select which patients can attend. Hospice at Home have already lost staff, but are having their hours further reduced. At present there are only 1 - 2 members of staff on duty each day and with this further reduction, there will be only one person on duty for most days of the week for 28 weeks of the year, and none at all if anyone happens to go sick. This will have a massive effect on symptomatic patients at home, as 2 nurses are needed to administer controlled drugs.

All 3 nursing sisters are being made redundant, with the loss of many years of knowledge, experience and clinical skills. There will only be a minimum of staff nurses to manage the In-patient unit and the day service between them. Hospice at Home will have band 6 nurses. Unlike other hospices which employ several complementary therapists, Bury Hospice is making the complementary therapist role redundant also.

Other redundancies include kitchen, housekeeping and fundraising staff, all of the above being front-line.

Needless to say, NO redundancies are taking place within the management team, administration, and all the assistants to the assistants in supporting retail and administration.

What a very sad time for Bury Hospice.
Some further cash - but still at a terrible cost to patients and staff. No change to the In-patient unit beds as they currently have 5 open. For a very short period last year they opened to 9, but have predominantly run on 5 - 6 the whole time the new building has been open. Day Services have always operated over 3 days a week at both hospices, with places for 8 - 10 patients on each of those days. There are approx 10 patients on the waiting list at the moment. This service is being cut to just one day a week! The patients are poorly and really value this service, as do their families. With only 9 comfy chairs, it may be difficult now to select which patients can attend. Hospice at Home have already lost staff, but are having their hours further reduced. At present there are only 1 - 2 members of staff on duty each day and with this further reduction, there will be only one person on duty for most days of the week for 28 weeks of the year, and none at all if anyone happens to go sick. This will have a massive effect on symptomatic patients at home, as 2 nurses are needed to administer controlled drugs. All 3 nursing sisters are being made redundant, with the loss of many years of knowledge, experience and clinical skills. There will only be a minimum of staff nurses to manage the In-patient unit and the day service between them. Hospice at Home will have band 6 nurses. Unlike other hospices which employ several complementary therapists, Bury Hospice is making the complementary therapist role redundant also. Other redundancies include kitchen, housekeeping and fundraising staff, all of the above being front-line. Needless to say, NO redundancies are taking place within the management team, administration, and all the assistants to the assistants in supporting retail and administration. What a very sad time for Bury Hospice. Aviator123
  • Score: 12

9:49pm Sun 10 Aug 14

Babbar Divino says...

Aviator123 wrote:
Some further cash - but still at a terrible cost to patients and staff. No change to the In-patient unit beds as they currently have 5 open. For a very short period last year they opened to 9, but have predominantly run on 5 - 6 the whole time the new building has been open. Day Services have always operated over 3 days a week at both hospices, with places for 8 - 10 patients on each of those days. There are approx 10 patients on the waiting list at the moment. This service is being cut to just one day a week! The patients are poorly and really value this service, as do their families. With only 9 comfy chairs, it may be difficult now to select which patients can attend. Hospice at Home have already lost staff, but are having their hours further reduced. At present there are only 1 - 2 members of staff on duty each day and with this further reduction, there will be only one person on duty for most days of the week for 28 weeks of the year, and none at all if anyone happens to go sick. This will have a massive effect on symptomatic patients at home, as 2 nurses are needed to administer controlled drugs.

All 3 nursing sisters are being made redundant, with the loss of many years of knowledge, experience and clinical skills. There will only be a minimum of staff nurses to manage the In-patient unit and the day service between them. Hospice at Home will have band 6 nurses. Unlike other hospices which employ several complementary therapists, Bury Hospice is making the complementary therapist role redundant also.

Other redundancies include kitchen, housekeeping and fundraising staff, all of the above being front-line.

Needless to say, NO redundancies are taking place within the management team, administration, and all the assistants to the assistants in supporting retail and administration.

What a very sad time for Bury Hospice.
Now if there were actually journalists around as opposed to computers which just troll sites looking for stories from other sources, this information from Aviator would have them digging around finding out just what is going on at the Hospice.
[quote][p][bold]Aviator123[/bold] wrote: Some further cash - but still at a terrible cost to patients and staff. No change to the In-patient unit beds as they currently have 5 open. For a very short period last year they opened to 9, but have predominantly run on 5 - 6 the whole time the new building has been open. Day Services have always operated over 3 days a week at both hospices, with places for 8 - 10 patients on each of those days. There are approx 10 patients on the waiting list at the moment. This service is being cut to just one day a week! The patients are poorly and really value this service, as do their families. With only 9 comfy chairs, it may be difficult now to select which patients can attend. Hospice at Home have already lost staff, but are having their hours further reduced. At present there are only 1 - 2 members of staff on duty each day and with this further reduction, there will be only one person on duty for most days of the week for 28 weeks of the year, and none at all if anyone happens to go sick. This will have a massive effect on symptomatic patients at home, as 2 nurses are needed to administer controlled drugs. All 3 nursing sisters are being made redundant, with the loss of many years of knowledge, experience and clinical skills. There will only be a minimum of staff nurses to manage the In-patient unit and the day service between them. Hospice at Home will have band 6 nurses. Unlike other hospices which employ several complementary therapists, Bury Hospice is making the complementary therapist role redundant also. Other redundancies include kitchen, housekeeping and fundraising staff, all of the above being front-line. Needless to say, NO redundancies are taking place within the management team, administration, and all the assistants to the assistants in supporting retail and administration. What a very sad time for Bury Hospice.[/p][/quote]Now if there were actually journalists around as opposed to computers which just troll sites looking for stories from other sources, this information from Aviator would have them digging around finding out just what is going on at the Hospice. Babbar Divino
  • Score: 16

10:04pm Sun 10 Aug 14

White Admiral says...

Babba Divino, You are correct and it would not take a lot of effort to collate and verify the allegations and determine the true facts! The people of Bury need to know the truth about the situation at the hospice and also the Charities Commission. It makes me wonder if they have even been informed or indeed are they really going to consider those issues that have put this charity into disrepute. Certainly the Bury Times could broker a pubic meeting and advertise it as well. I certainly would like to ask a few questions that would make some key people running the charity squirm!
Babba Divino, You are correct and it would not take a lot of effort to collate and verify the allegations and determine the true facts! The people of Bury need to know the truth about the situation at the hospice and also the Charities Commission. It makes me wonder if they have even been informed or indeed are they really going to consider those issues that have put this charity into disrepute. Certainly the Bury Times could broker a pubic meeting and advertise it as well. I certainly would like to ask a few questions that would make some key people running the charity squirm! White Admiral
  • Score: 16

10:18am Mon 11 Aug 14

SHEILAMCCAFFREY says...

its a sad for for my friends feel sorry for them just glad i am not there any more due to incompetent management
its a sad for for my friends feel sorry for them just glad i am not there any more due to incompetent management SHEILAMCCAFFREY
  • Score: 9

10:18am Mon 11 Aug 14

SHEILAMCCAFFREY says...

its a sad for for my friends feel sorry for them just glad i am not there any more due to incompetent management
its a sad for for my friends feel sorry for them just glad i am not there any more due to incompetent management SHEILAMCCAFFREY
  • Score: 9

4:14pm Mon 11 Aug 14

MMaxted15 says...

Good news about the £124,000, but I wonder what they are going to spend the money on. They can only open 6 beds due to funding and the fact they have not got the nursing staff. Staff have left or are about to leave because of the uncertainty of their jobs and how the hospice is being run. Yet in the next few months they are making experience nurses redundant. Is the money to be used on agency nurses which will be required because of under staffing. I think we have all read in the press about the NHS and the use of agency nurses and what the cost is. The redundancies don't stop there. A complimentary therapist, cleaners and catering staff are all affected. All these people make up a team which are all needed to care for people who have a terminal illness. They are also needed to support the family. Does this not go against the Philosophy of Care which is provided by Bury Hospice?. The staff they have, build up a special bond between the patient and family which offers great support and comfort at a difficult time. This cannot be said of an agency nurse, no matter how good they are, because it is the time spent with the patient and their family that is important. This cannot be achieved with the odd shift here and there.
Also how do you decide which patients are coming to Day Services when it is only open one day a week. How do you monitor these patients?
Lastly if Bury Hospice is short of money coming in why do you make a person who is part of the fundraising team redundant.
Good news about the £124,000, but I wonder what they are going to spend the money on. They can only open 6 beds due to funding and the fact they have not got the nursing staff. Staff have left or are about to leave because of the uncertainty of their jobs and how the hospice is being run. Yet in the next few months they are making experience nurses redundant. Is the money to be used on agency nurses which will be required because of under staffing. I think we have all read in the press about the NHS and the use of agency nurses and what the cost is. The redundancies don't stop there. A complimentary therapist, cleaners and catering staff are all affected. All these people make up a team which are all needed to care for people who have a terminal illness. They are also needed to support the family. Does this not go against the Philosophy of Care which is provided by Bury Hospice?. The staff they have, build up a special bond between the patient and family which offers great support and comfort at a difficult time. This cannot be said of an agency nurse, no matter how good they are, because it is the time spent with the patient and their family that is important. This cannot be achieved with the odd shift here and there. Also how do you decide which patients are coming to Day Services when it is only open one day a week. How do you monitor these patients? Lastly if Bury Hospice is short of money coming in why do you make a person who is part of the fundraising team redundant. MMaxted15
  • Score: 14

8:18pm Mon 11 Aug 14

notthedancingqueen says...

completely agree with previous comments. Just to add a few other thoughts: the general public are probably not aware that there have already been a number of redundancies over the previous twelve months, and where other staff have left they have not been replaced. Some staff whilst technically have not been made redundant, their positions have been made untenable and have been forced to resign including the two fund raising managers from Bury Hospice and Grace's Place. How clever is that,-two charities niether one with a fundraising managerI- It will also be the only hospice in the country without a complementary therapist, another brilliant move on behalf of the senior management team. The hospice is also employing and paying agency staff more per hour than their regular staff. How to make staff feel valued and appreciated The regular staff remain in charge of patient care and undertake complex decisions relating to patient care, often involving difficult drug calculations. The agency staff don't have the required knowledge and skills, and are not familiar with all the policies and procedures that are required when caring for dying patients. It is interesting to learn that the CCG have given a six months life line to the hospice, are they aware that all the services are being reduced and some patients who need to access the services won't be able to because the hospice are simply not able to accommodate them. However the hospice cannot say to these patients, come back in six months and then we'll care for you , the sad fact is that unfortunately the majority of people waiting for care now won't be here in six months. Now that's what I call a considered, clever, well thought out business plan. Come back Agnetha!!!
completely agree with previous comments. Just to add a few other thoughts: the general public are probably not aware that there have already been a number of redundancies over the previous twelve months, and where other staff have left they have not been replaced. Some staff whilst technically have not been made redundant, their positions have been made untenable and have been forced to resign including the two fund raising managers from Bury Hospice and Grace's Place. How clever is that,-two charities niether one with a fundraising managerI- It will also be the only hospice in the country without a complementary therapist, another brilliant move on behalf of the senior management team. The hospice is also employing and paying agency staff more per hour than their regular staff. How to make staff feel valued and appreciated The regular staff remain in charge of patient care and undertake complex decisions relating to patient care, often involving difficult drug calculations. The agency staff don't have the required knowledge and skills, and are not familiar with all the policies and procedures that are required when caring for dying patients. It is interesting to learn that the CCG have given a six months life line to the hospice, are they aware that all the services are being reduced and some patients who need to access the services won't be able to because the hospice are simply not able to accommodate them. However the hospice cannot say to these patients, come back in six months and then we'll care for you , the sad fact is that unfortunately the majority of people waiting for care now won't be here in six months. Now that's what I call a considered, clever, well thought out business plan. Come back Agnetha!!! notthedancingqueen
  • Score: 13

10:28am Tue 12 Aug 14

Renmus says...

As an outsider and a member of the public, reading these comments, I am rather concerned about what the £124,000 is actually for. Running on minimum inadequately trained staff that are under pressure to provide a service that is almost nonexistent, I can't help wondering if it will be paying to keep the managers and non medical staff in their jobs, for the foreseeable future, at least. From what I can observe it will not be long before the hospice folds altogether, so who will be looking after the terminally ill then?
As an outsider and a member of the public, reading these comments, I am rather concerned about what the £124,000 is actually for. Running on minimum inadequately trained staff that are under pressure to provide a service that is almost nonexistent, I can't help wondering if it will be paying to keep the managers and non medical staff in their jobs, for the foreseeable future, at least. From what I can observe it will not be long before the hospice folds altogether, so who will be looking after the terminally ill then? Renmus
  • Score: 14

7:11pm Tue 12 Aug 14

greymater says...

This is terrible news. Nurses who are described as angels having to leave. Cleaning staff and cooking staff being forced out. For goodness sake get rid of some admin. Get rid of so called "Managers" who have let the Hospice and the people of Bury + the local areas down. They should be ashamed that they have not got the intelligence to run a Hospice, a disgrace. I hope the books have been checked and they have had to say where the money has gone. Patient care should be the first and last priority.
This is terrible news. Nurses who are described as angels having to leave. Cleaning staff and cooking staff being forced out. For goodness sake get rid of some admin. Get rid of so called "Managers" who have let the Hospice and the people of Bury + the local areas down. They should be ashamed that they have not got the intelligence to run a Hospice, a disgrace. I hope the books have been checked and they have had to say where the money has gone. Patient care should be the first and last priority. greymater
  • Score: 6

3:23pm Wed 13 Aug 14

ABreakFromTheNorm says...

The extra £124,000 will only cover reduced donations due to adverse publicity at this rate.

Clearly there are management issues. Without constructive dialogue between all interested parties the hospice will ultimately close. The signs are there for all to see.
The extra £124,000 will only cover reduced donations due to adverse publicity at this rate. Clearly there are management issues. Without constructive dialogue between all interested parties the hospice will ultimately close. The signs are there for all to see. ABreakFromTheNorm
  • Score: 5

8:09pm Thu 14 Aug 14

Aletheia1978 says...

Has anyone ever read Animal Farm???
Has anyone ever read Animal Farm??? Aletheia1978
  • Score: 1

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