Pane of glass falls 10 feet onto shopper in main entrance of Harwood Morrisons

The main entrance at Morrisons in Lea Gate, Harwood, where a pane of glass fell from the canopy and landed on a man underneath.

The main entrance at Morrisons in Lea Gate, Harwood, where a pane of glass fell from the canopy and landed on a man underneath.

First published in News
Last updated
This Is Lancashire: Photograph of the Author by , crime reporter

A PANE of glass fell 10 feet and landed on a stunned shopper as he was standing in the entrance to the Morrisons supermarket in Harwood.

The Lea Gate store was plunged into chaos at about 5.45pm this evening, but Morrisons insists that panels of glass at its Harwood store are safe.

The glass fell about 10 feet from a canopy above the main entrance and landed on a shopper who was standing beneath it.

The incident is thought to have been caused by microscopic fractures which occurred during the manufacturing process.

The shop was able to stay open, using a fire exit for shoppers to enter the supermarket while the main entrance was roped off so staff could clear the debris.

Dr Kirby, who runs Crompton Health Centre in Crompton Way, was shopping with his daughter when the pane of glass fell out of its frame and shattered on the ground below.

He carried out first aid on the man who was injured by the glass, before an ambulance arrived

A Morrisons spokesman said: “The incident is being investigated by Morrisons and we are also in touch with the local authority.

"Specialist consultants have reassured us the remaining panels are safe.”

A North West Ambulance spokesman said an ambulance arrived at the supermarket just before 6pm but left, without a patient, at 6.45pm.

The man was treated at the scene but suffered only minor cuts after the glass pane had fallen on him, the spokesman added.

Comments (27)

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10:09pm Wed 30 Jul 14

nigella farrage says...

All depends how old the glass is as to whether it should have happened or not due to checks

Glass is a very slow moving liquid and in time it will move and get out of shape and eventually fall. But Morrisons should be checking all the glass regularly.

On the other hand it could just be one of those incidents which is just extraordinary.
All depends how old the glass is as to whether it should have happened or not due to checks Glass is a very slow moving liquid and in time it will move and get out of shape and eventually fall. But Morrisons should be checking all the glass regularly. On the other hand it could just be one of those incidents which is just extraordinary. nigella farrage
  • Score: -62

10:17pm Wed 30 Jul 14

rhibbert says...

One pane of glass at the same store did this to my mum a few years ago ! it needs sorting properly thats two people hurt due to their lack of care to ensure the problem was fixed in the first incident! what a joke. Hope the gentleman is okay!
One pane of glass at the same store did this to my mum a few years ago ! it needs sorting properly thats two people hurt due to their lack of care to ensure the problem was fixed in the first incident! what a joke. Hope the gentleman is okay! rhibbert
  • Score: 6

11:49pm Wed 30 Jul 14

LLdale says...

Staff don't get paid to check the glass.. How has this made the news!! Seriously??
Staff don't get paid to check the glass.. How has this made the news!! Seriously?? LLdale
  • Score: -19

6:08am Thu 31 Jul 14

Dirty Hamed says...

nigella farrage wrote:
All depends how old the glass is as to whether it should have happened or not due to checks

Glass is a very slow moving liquid and in time it will move and get out of shape and eventually fall. But Morrisons should be checking all the glass regularly.

On the other hand it could just be one of those incidents which is just extraordinary.
I think you'll find that glass in it's pane form is a solid.
[quote][p][bold]nigella farrage[/bold] wrote: All depends how old the glass is as to whether it should have happened or not due to checks Glass is a very slow moving liquid and in time it will move and get out of shape and eventually fall. But Morrisons should be checking all the glass regularly. On the other hand it could just be one of those incidents which is just extraordinary.[/p][/quote]I think you'll find that glass in it's pane form is a solid. Dirty Hamed
  • Score: 5

12:47pm Thu 31 Jul 14

nigella farrage says...

No glass is a solid as over time it will warp due to the movement.

That is why windows have to be replaced after so many years.
No glass is a solid as over time it will warp due to the movement. That is why windows have to be replaced after so many years. nigella farrage
  • Score: -35

3:28pm Thu 31 Jul 14

mr.mark.c says...

nigella farrage wrote:
No glass is a solid as over time it will warp due to the movement.

That is why windows have to be replaced after so many years.
It's a solid, it does not move at all, quote below from a glass fact site.

The observation that old windows are sometimes found to be thicker at the bottom than at the top is often offered as supporting evidence for the view that glass flows over a timescale of centuries, the assumption being that the glass was once uniform but has flowed to its new shape, which is a property of liquid. However, this assumption is incorrect; once solidified, glass stops flowing. The reason for the observation is that in the past, when panes of glass were commonly made by glassblowers, the technique used was to spin molten glass so as to create a round, mostly flat and even plate. This plate was then cut to fit a window. The pieces were not, however, absolutely flat; the edges of the disk became a different thickness as the glass spun. When installed in a window frame, the glass would be placed with the thicker side down both for the sake of stability and to prevent water accumulating in the lead cames at the bottom of the window.
[quote][p][bold]nigella farrage[/bold] wrote: No glass is a solid as over time it will warp due to the movement. That is why windows have to be replaced after so many years.[/p][/quote]It's a solid, it does not move at all, quote below from a glass fact site. The observation that old windows are sometimes found to be thicker at the bottom than at the top is often offered as supporting evidence for the view that glass flows over a timescale of centuries, the assumption being that the glass was once uniform but has flowed to its new shape, which is a property of liquid. However, this assumption is incorrect; once solidified, glass stops flowing. The reason for the observation is that in the past, when panes of glass were commonly made by glassblowers, the technique used was to spin molten glass so as to create a round, mostly flat and even plate. This plate was then cut to fit a window. The pieces were not, however, absolutely flat; the edges of the disk became a different thickness as the glass spun. When installed in a window frame, the glass would be placed with the thicker side down both for the sake of stability and to prevent water accumulating in the lead cames at the bottom of the window. mr.mark.c
  • Score: 15

5:05pm Thu 31 Jul 14

OriginalAngryDad says...

LLdale wrote:
Staff don't get paid to check the glass.. How has this made the news!! Seriously??
Actually they do.

Morissons, like all the major retailers take SHEQ very seriously and will have a check system in place which will involve regular visual and periodic physical inspections of the building's structure, including the glass.

I'm not saying these checks actually get carried out, I'm just saying they will be paying someone whose job will include responsibility for these checks being done and recorded.
[quote][p][bold]LLdale[/bold] wrote: Staff don't get paid to check the glass.. How has this made the news!! Seriously??[/p][/quote]Actually they do. Morissons, like all the major retailers take SHEQ very seriously and will have a check system in place which will involve regular visual and periodic physical inspections of the building's structure, including the glass. I'm not saying these checks actually get carried out, I'm just saying they will be paying someone whose job will include responsibility for these checks being done and recorded. OriginalAngryDad
  • Score: 3

5:10pm Thu 31 Jul 14

bernie boy says...

Lol! I knew some idiot would chip in with the old 'glass is a liquid' statement. It's almost as if the internet doesn't exist. If you google Google, your computer will explode.
Lol! I knew some idiot would chip in with the old 'glass is a liquid' statement. It's almost as if the internet doesn't exist. If you google Google, your computer will explode. bernie boy
  • Score: 17

5:19pm Thu 31 Jul 14

andy_88 says...

I live near that store and hate the place its a dive i refuse to go in anymore. everything is a hand me down from other stores so i really do doubt there has been proper safety checks on other things such as what has happened here. Hope the person is ok.
I live near that store and hate the place its a dive i refuse to go in anymore. everything is a hand me down from other stores so i really do doubt there has been proper safety checks on other things such as what has happened here. Hope the person is ok. andy_88
  • Score: -12

6:34pm Thu 31 Jul 14

yellowbeaver08 says...

I Hope he puts a claim in , they are already nearly going bust, this should put the icing on the cake
I Hope he puts a claim in , they are already nearly going bust, this should put the icing on the cake yellowbeaver08
  • Score: -10

6:36pm Thu 31 Jul 14

nigella farrage says...

Bernie boy,

my old china, it seems you didn't stay awake during physics lessons at school. Glass is a noncrystalline substance and not a crystalline solid!

Glass may seem that it I a solid it scientifically it is a liquid (i.e. noncrystalline). Perfect example are houses which haven't had the windows replaced in 50 years and you will see that the glass is thicker at the bottom of the pane than at the top, because the glass has "warped" aka does what a liquid does under gravity and sunk downwards!
Bernie boy, my old china, it seems you didn't stay awake during physics lessons at school. Glass is a noncrystalline substance and not a crystalline solid! Glass may seem that it I a solid it scientifically it is a liquid (i.e. noncrystalline). Perfect example are houses which haven't had the windows replaced in 50 years and you will see that the glass is thicker at the bottom of the pane than at the top, because the glass has "warped" aka does what a liquid does under gravity and sunk downwards! nigella farrage
  • Score: -19

6:45pm Thu 31 Jul 14

mr.mark.c says...

nigella farrage wrote:
Bernie boy,

my old china, it seems you didn't stay awake during physics lessons at school. Glass is a noncrystalline substance and not a crystalline solid!

Glass may seem that it I a solid it scientifically it is a liquid (i.e. noncrystalline). Perfect example are houses which haven't had the windows replaced in 50 years and you will see that the glass is thicker at the bottom of the pane than at the top, because the glass has "warped" aka does what a liquid does under gravity and sunk downwards!
That is how it was made and cut, my last post explains this or did you choose to miss it.
[quote][p][bold]nigella farrage[/bold] wrote: Bernie boy, my old china, it seems you didn't stay awake during physics lessons at school. Glass is a noncrystalline substance and not a crystalline solid! Glass may seem that it I a solid it scientifically it is a liquid (i.e. noncrystalline). Perfect example are houses which haven't had the windows replaced in 50 years and you will see that the glass is thicker at the bottom of the pane than at the top, because the glass has "warped" aka does what a liquid does under gravity and sunk downwards![/p][/quote]That is how it was made and cut, my last post explains this or did you choose to miss it. mr.mark.c
  • Score: 16

6:48pm Thu 31 Jul 14

bernie boy says...

nigella farrage wrote:
Bernie boy,

my old china, it seems you didn't stay awake during physics lessons at school. Glass is a noncrystalline substance and not a crystalline solid!

Glass may seem that it I a solid it scientifically it is a liquid (i.e. noncrystalline). Perfect example are houses which haven't had the windows replaced in 50 years and you will see that the glass is thicker at the bottom of the pane than at the top, because the glass has "warped" aka does what a liquid does under gravity and sunk downwards!
Most of us have heard the story: Medieval cathedrals have window glass that's thicker at the bottom than at the top.

That happens, we were told, because glass is a liquid at room temperature, and over the centuries, it slowly flowed downward.

But recently, scientists examined a sample of 20-million-year-old Dominican amber, a naturally occurring glass. They found that the structure of the amber did not change with stress or heat any more than a newer sample would. What's going on?

A quick physics lesson: The difference between a solid and a liquid has to do with its molecular structure. A solid has regularly arranged molecules in a crystalline structure. As a solid is heated, its molecules vibrate until the solid reaches its melting point and its crystal structure breaks down.

Liquids become solid when they lose enough heat. Sometimes, a liquid is "supercooled" if it remains a liquid beyond its normal freezing point.

After looking at bottom-heavy medieval windows, some observers claimed that glass is a supercooled liquid because it's solid, but is still flowing. In fact, glass is neither a liquid nor a solid, but a state in between known as an amorphous solid.

Glass "is not as organized as a crystal, because it did not freeze, but it is more organized than a liquid," according to Scientific American. Because glass is an amorphous solid, "it would take longer than the universe has existed for room-temperature cathedral glass to rearrange itself to appear melted."

Indeed, even much older glass artifacts from ancient Roman and Egyptian ruins show no signs of melting over the centuries, according to researchers.

Medieval windows are thicker in spots due to the way they were made, not because the glass is a liquid, scientists say. The windows were created by glassblowers who made glass cylinders that were then flattened into panes.

The flattening was uneven, and the thicker parts were installed on the window bottoms — probably because, otherwise, the glass would be top-heavy and less stable.

http://io9.com/the-g
lass-is-a-liquid-myt
h-has-finally-been-d
estroyed-496190894
[quote][p][bold]nigella farrage[/bold] wrote: Bernie boy, my old china, it seems you didn't stay awake during physics lessons at school. Glass is a noncrystalline substance and not a crystalline solid! Glass may seem that it I a solid it scientifically it is a liquid (i.e. noncrystalline). Perfect example are houses which haven't had the windows replaced in 50 years and you will see that the glass is thicker at the bottom of the pane than at the top, because the glass has "warped" aka does what a liquid does under gravity and sunk downwards![/p][/quote]Most of us have heard the story: Medieval cathedrals have window glass that's thicker at the bottom than at the top. That happens, we were told, because glass is a liquid at room temperature, and over the centuries, it slowly flowed downward. But recently, scientists examined a sample of 20-million-year-old Dominican amber, a naturally occurring glass. They found that the structure of the amber did not change with stress or heat any more than a newer sample would. What's going on? A quick physics lesson: The difference between a solid and a liquid has to do with its molecular structure. A solid has regularly arranged molecules in a crystalline structure. As a solid is heated, its molecules vibrate until the solid reaches its melting point and its crystal structure breaks down. Liquids become solid when they lose enough heat. Sometimes, a liquid is "supercooled" if it remains a liquid beyond its normal freezing point. After looking at bottom-heavy medieval windows, some observers claimed that glass is a supercooled liquid because it's solid, but is still flowing. In fact, glass is neither a liquid nor a solid, but a state in between known as an amorphous solid. Glass "is not as organized as a crystal, because it did not freeze, but it is more organized than a liquid," according to Scientific American. Because glass is an amorphous solid, "it would take longer than the universe has existed for room-temperature cathedral glass to rearrange itself to appear melted." Indeed, even much older glass artifacts from ancient Roman and Egyptian ruins show no signs of melting over the centuries, according to researchers. Medieval windows are thicker in spots due to the way they were made, not because the glass is a liquid, scientists say. The windows were created by glassblowers who made glass cylinders that were then flattened into panes. The flattening was uneven, and the thicker parts were installed on the window bottoms — probably because, otherwise, the glass would be top-heavy and less stable. http://io9.com/the-g lass-is-a-liquid-myt h-has-finally-been-d estroyed-496190894 bernie boy
  • Score: 27

6:51pm Thu 31 Jul 14

boltonnut says...

What a pane in the gl ****.
What a pane in the gl ****. boltonnut
  • Score: 3

9:04pm Thu 31 Jul 14

Browny91 says...

I know Morrisons said they were dropping everything but I didn't think this included windows
I know Morrisons said they were dropping everything but I didn't think this included windows Browny91
  • Score: 10

1:41am Fri 1 Aug 14

LLdale says...

OriginalAngryDad wrote:
LLdale wrote:
Staff don't get paid to check the glass.. How has this made the news!! Seriously??
Actually they do.

Morissons, like all the major retailers take SHEQ very seriously and will have a check system in place which will involve regular visual and periodic physical inspections of the building's structure, including the glass.

I'm not saying these checks actually get carried out, I'm just saying they will be paying someone whose job will include responsibility for these checks being done and recorded.
Actually staff don't, I am staff.. Yes an outside company would replace if reported, but how is someone suppose to know if there is a problem with it when no one can see the problem happening, we don't examine the windows, not one persons job description says expecting the glass daily!
Accidents happen and sadly someone was hurt
[quote][p][bold]OriginalAngryDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LLdale[/bold] wrote: Staff don't get paid to check the glass.. How has this made the news!! Seriously??[/p][/quote]Actually they do. Morissons, like all the major retailers take SHEQ very seriously and will have a check system in place which will involve regular visual and periodic physical inspections of the building's structure, including the glass. I'm not saying these checks actually get carried out, I'm just saying they will be paying someone whose job will include responsibility for these checks being done and recorded.[/p][/quote]Actually staff don't, I am staff.. Yes an outside company would replace if reported, but how is someone suppose to know if there is a problem with it when no one can see the problem happening, we don't examine the windows, not one persons job description says expecting the glass daily! Accidents happen and sadly someone was hurt LLdale
  • Score: 10

1:47am Fri 1 Aug 14

LLdale says...

And for the record it wasn't a pane of glass that fell, it was pieces of shattered glass, he had a few minor cuts, Bolton news have to over do it to get it in the news!
And for the record it wasn't a pane of glass that fell, it was pieces of shattered glass, he had a few minor cuts, Bolton news have to over do it to get it in the news! LLdale
  • Score: 10

2:17am Fri 1 Aug 14

mr.mark.c says...

LLdale wrote:
And for the record it wasn't a pane of glass that fell, it was pieces of shattered glass, he had a few minor cuts, Bolton news have to over do it to get it in the news!
Toughened glass can shatter if it has a flaw, only the most expert window cleaner would be able to see the flaw using a CSI type flashing camera thing as seen on TV when it zooms in.
Or it melted (nahhh)
I think the recent heat exposed a flaw and it went bang, no blame and deffo no claim.
Try smashing a car spark plug and then throwing a tiny fragment of the white ceramic at the same type window ;)
[quote][p][bold]LLdale[/bold] wrote: And for the record it wasn't a pane of glass that fell, it was pieces of shattered glass, he had a few minor cuts, Bolton news have to over do it to get it in the news![/p][/quote]Toughened glass can shatter if it has a flaw, only the most expert window cleaner would be able to see the flaw using a CSI type flashing camera thing as seen on TV when it zooms in. Or it melted (nahhh) I think the recent heat exposed a flaw and it went bang, no blame and deffo no claim. Try smashing a car spark plug and then throwing a tiny fragment of the white ceramic at the same type window ;) mr.mark.c
  • Score: -1

4:29am Fri 1 Aug 14

thomas222 says...

Has anyone apart from Nigella made made a mistake before. Lets start getting real people and all stop jumping on the slightest little thing that in the scheme of things is bugger all. If we all do that again we may get back to how we all would like it to be. Poor bugger who put that glass in is going to get hung for making a mistake and he may have three kids.
Has anyone apart from Nigella made made a mistake before. Lets start getting real people and all stop jumping on the slightest little thing that in the scheme of things is bugger all. If we all do that again we may get back to how we all would like it to be. Poor bugger who put that glass in is going to get hung for making a mistake and he may have three kids. thomas222
  • Score: 20

4:31am Fri 1 Aug 14

thomas222 says...

nigella farrage wrote:
Bernie boy,

my old china, it seems you didn't stay awake during physics lessons at school. Glass is a noncrystalline substance and not a crystalline solid!

Glass may seem that it I a solid it scientifically it is a liquid (i.e. noncrystalline). Perfect example are houses which haven't had the windows replaced in 50 years and you will see that the glass is thicker at the bottom of the pane than at the top, because the glass has "warped" aka does what a liquid does under gravity and sunk downwards!
Why are you Unemployed ?
[quote][p][bold]nigella farrage[/bold] wrote: Bernie boy, my old china, it seems you didn't stay awake during physics lessons at school. Glass is a noncrystalline substance and not a crystalline solid! Glass may seem that it I a solid it scientifically it is a liquid (i.e. noncrystalline). Perfect example are houses which haven't had the windows replaced in 50 years and you will see that the glass is thicker at the bottom of the pane than at the top, because the glass has "warped" aka does what a liquid does under gravity and sunk downwards![/p][/quote]Why are you Unemployed ? thomas222
  • Score: 10

4:34am Fri 1 Aug 14

thomas222 says...

nigella farrage wrote:
No glass is a solid as over time it will warp due to the movement.

That is why windows have to be replaced after so many years.
Who invented Glass clever clogs ?
[quote][p][bold]nigella farrage[/bold] wrote: No glass is a solid as over time it will warp due to the movement. That is why windows have to be replaced after so many years.[/p][/quote]Who invented Glass clever clogs ? thomas222
  • Score: 6

4:50am Fri 1 Aug 14

thomas222 says...

nigella farrage wrote:
All depends how old the glass is as to whether it should have happened or not due to checks

Glass is a very slow moving liquid and in time it will move and get out of shape and eventually fall. But Morrisons should be checking all the glass regularly.

On the other hand it could just be one of those incidents which is just extraordinary.
The reason why you know so much so you think is because you have spent all your time reading instead of producing something worthwhile and the only jobs you have had in between signing on here and the Netherlands is working in the service industry. Is that why you get so angry on here, You can say things you cant do in real life. Your a closet Angry Man old Son.
Sorry for the rant Folks but he is a serial Troll who is well known on certain forums.
[quote][p][bold]nigella farrage[/bold] wrote: All depends how old the glass is as to whether it should have happened or not due to checks Glass is a very slow moving liquid and in time it will move and get out of shape and eventually fall. But Morrisons should be checking all the glass regularly. On the other hand it could just be one of those incidents which is just extraordinary.[/p][/quote]The reason why you know so much so you think is because you have spent all your time reading instead of producing something worthwhile and the only jobs you have had in between signing on here and the Netherlands is working in the service industry. Is that why you get so angry on here, You can say things you cant do in real life. Your a closet Angry Man old Son. Sorry for the rant Folks but he is a serial Troll who is well known on certain forums. thomas222
  • Score: 1

4:54am Fri 1 Aug 14

thomas222 says...

LLdale wrote:
OriginalAngryDad wrote:
LLdale wrote:
Staff don't get paid to check the glass.. How has this made the news!! Seriously??
Actually they do.

Morissons, like all the major retailers take SHEQ very seriously and will have a check system in place which will involve regular visual and periodic physical inspections of the building's structure, including the glass.

I'm not saying these checks actually get carried out, I'm just saying they will be paying someone whose job will include responsibility for these checks being done and recorded.
Actually staff don't, I am staff.. Yes an outside company would replace if reported, but how is someone suppose to know if there is a problem with it when no one can see the problem happening, we don't examine the windows, not one persons job description says expecting the glass daily!
Accidents happen and sadly someone was hurt
Correct!.. He without sin cast the first stone.. we all make bloody mistakes for Gods sake. Some are worse than others but thats fate not meant.
[quote][p][bold]LLdale[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]OriginalAngryDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LLdale[/bold] wrote: Staff don't get paid to check the glass.. How has this made the news!! Seriously??[/p][/quote]Actually they do. Morissons, like all the major retailers take SHEQ very seriously and will have a check system in place which will involve regular visual and periodic physical inspections of the building's structure, including the glass. I'm not saying these checks actually get carried out, I'm just saying they will be paying someone whose job will include responsibility for these checks being done and recorded.[/p][/quote]Actually staff don't, I am staff.. Yes an outside company would replace if reported, but how is someone suppose to know if there is a problem with it when no one can see the problem happening, we don't examine the windows, not one persons job description says expecting the glass daily! Accidents happen and sadly someone was hurt[/p][/quote]Correct!.. He without sin cast the first stone.. we all make bloody mistakes for Gods sake. Some are worse than others but thats fate not meant. thomas222
  • Score: 4

4:55am Fri 1 Aug 14

mr.mark.c says...

thomas222 wrote:
nigella farrage wrote:
All depends how old the glass is as to whether it should have happened or not due to checks

Glass is a very slow moving liquid and in time it will move and get out of shape and eventually fall. But Morrisons should be checking all the glass regularly.

On the other hand it could just be one of those incidents which is just extraordinary.
The reason why you know so much so you think is because you have spent all your time reading instead of producing something worthwhile and the only jobs you have had in between signing on here and the Netherlands is working in the service industry. Is that why you get so angry on here, You can say things you cant do in real life. Your a closet Angry Man old Son.
Sorry for the rant Folks but he is a serial Troll who is well known on certain forums.
Bing says over 5000yrs ago by a guy called Bob and most has not melted yet (for your last post)
As for this one, there is a huge sign that says 'Dunny feed the Troll' :)
[quote][p][bold]thomas222[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]nigella farrage[/bold] wrote: All depends how old the glass is as to whether it should have happened or not due to checks Glass is a very slow moving liquid and in time it will move and get out of shape and eventually fall. But Morrisons should be checking all the glass regularly. On the other hand it could just be one of those incidents which is just extraordinary.[/p][/quote]The reason why you know so much so you think is because you have spent all your time reading instead of producing something worthwhile and the only jobs you have had in between signing on here and the Netherlands is working in the service industry. Is that why you get so angry on here, You can say things you cant do in real life. Your a closet Angry Man old Son. Sorry for the rant Folks but he is a serial Troll who is well known on certain forums.[/p][/quote]Bing says over 5000yrs ago by a guy called Bob and most has not melted yet (for your last post) As for this one, there is a huge sign that says 'Dunny feed the Troll' :) mr.mark.c
  • Score: 1

8:06am Fri 1 Aug 14

MarkAllRead says...

Ouch, sounds like he was in pane.
Ouch, sounds like he was in pane. MarkAllRead
  • Score: 3

9:45am Fri 1 Aug 14

skintight says...

The other panes are safe?? Have they X-ray 'd them already!
The other panes are safe?? Have they X-ray 'd them already! skintight
  • Score: 2

9:53am Fri 1 Aug 14

OriginalAngryDad says...

LLdale wrote:
And for the record it wasn't a pane of glass that fell, it was pieces of shattered glass, he had a few minor cuts, Bolton news have to over do it to get it in the news!
"Actually staff don't, I am staff.. Yes an outside company would replace if reported, but how is someone suppose to know if there is a problem with it when no one can see the problem happening, we don't examine the windows, not one persons job description says expecting the glass daily!
Accidents happen and sadly someone was hurt"

Please, take it from me, that there will be someone who is responsible for checking the glass - Just because it's not you and you don't know who it is, doesn't mean that it isn't someone's responsibility.

"How is someone supposed to know there is a problem?" you ask...

By carrying out regular checks. (I never said daily by the way - the frequency of the checks will have been established by conducting risk assessments in the past.) That's kind of the whole point of doing them.....
[quote][p][bold]LLdale[/bold] wrote: And for the record it wasn't a pane of glass that fell, it was pieces of shattered glass, he had a few minor cuts, Bolton news have to over do it to get it in the news![/p][/quote]"Actually staff don't, I am staff.. Yes an outside company would replace if reported, but how is someone suppose to know if there is a problem with it when no one can see the problem happening, we don't examine the windows, not one persons job description says expecting the glass daily! Accidents happen and sadly someone was hurt" Please, take it from me, that there will be someone who is responsible for checking the glass - Just because it's not you and you don't know who it is, doesn't mean that it isn't someone's responsibility. "How is someone supposed to know there is a problem?" you ask... By carrying out regular checks. (I never said daily by the way - the frequency of the checks will have been established by conducting risk assessments in the past.) That's kind of the whole point of doing them..... OriginalAngryDad
  • Score: 5

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