Bins backlash: Bury Council responds

This Is Lancashire: Bins backlash: Bury Council responds Bins backlash: Bury Council responds

COUNCIL bosses have spoken out in response to a public outcry following last week's announcement of the bin collection shake-up.

Large families have been reassured they will be able to apply for a second grey bin and worries about health hazards and smells have also been addressed.

Cllr Susan Southworth, deputy cabinet member for the environment, said: “Understandably, there has been a lot of interest in these plans since they were made public and people have been voicing their concerns or support.

“One of the most asked questions has been from residents who have large families, wanting to know if they can apply for an extra grey bin. The answer is yes; we will continue to offer large families the chance to apply for a second grey bin if they can show they are recycling everything they can and still need extra grey bin space. For households with extra recycling we can also provide extra recycling bins.

“Another frequently raised topic was whether people would have enough space in their bins for their waste. Under the new system, the total weekly bin space that residents will have across all their bins will not change — across all four bins, the space will stay the same as it is now. It is also worth remembering that, not so many years ago, Bury residents had only one bin for all their household waste.

“A number of people have raised the question of increased smell from the bins. Any cooked or uncooked food waste should be placed in the brown bin, which is not affected by these changes. And there should be no hazard to health if, before going in the grey bin, disposable nappies are folded up, bagged and tied up and the same applies to any animal waste.

“Some people who have recently down-sized their grey bin to a 140-litre bin have asked if they can go back to a full-sized 240-litre bin. We would ask these residents to please give the new system a try for a couple of collections. If you recycle everything you can in your recycling bins you may well have enough space, but we will swap the bin for a larger one for any households that are unable to manage.

“We will be sending all households an information leaflet explaining the changes by the start of September followed by an information pack with advice on how to recycle more and put the right items in the right bin.

“We will also be visiting areas across the borough, talking to residents about recycling and helping to remove any barriers there may be to making recycling a normal part of daily life."

To help residents understand the changes under consideration, Bury Council has published a list of questions and answers on its website. Go to bury.gov.uk/collectionchanges-faqs

Comments (29)

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8:13pm Thu 17 Jul 14

Babbar Divino says...

"........we will continue to offer large families the chance to apply for a second grey bin if they can show they are recycling everything......"

1. How do you demonstrate this to qualify? How many bin nazis will be employed to verify this and what is the cost?
2. Why are they called Council Bosses? They are elected representatives of the people implementing the peoples will (or not) :)

The big issue here is the recycling process. It's was too complicated and now it's even more complicated. 4 bins with different emptying schedules. You need to be a logistics expert to work out which bins to put out.

There are other western countries where there are 2 bins. 1 for household waste and 1 for recycling (cardboard, plastic, glass etc.). These bins are emptied weekly in rotation ie. Week 1 household, week 2 recycling.

Would you be surprised to know that the recycling rates of these countries are higher than the UK?

It's not rocket science even though the loonie Councillors (AKA Council Bosses) try and make it so.
"........we will continue to offer large families the chance to apply for a second grey bin if they can show they are recycling everything......" 1. How do you demonstrate this to qualify? How many bin nazis will be employed to verify this and what is the cost? 2. Why are they called Council Bosses? They are elected representatives of the people implementing the peoples will (or not) :) The big issue here is the recycling process. It's was too complicated and now it's even more complicated. 4 bins with different emptying schedules. You need to be a logistics expert to work out which bins to put out. There are other western countries where there are 2 bins. 1 for household waste and 1 for recycling (cardboard, plastic, glass etc.). These bins are emptied weekly in rotation ie. Week 1 household, week 2 recycling. Would you be surprised to know that the recycling rates of these countries are higher than the UK? It's not rocket science even though the loonie Councillors (AKA Council Bosses) try and make it so. Babbar Divino
  • Score: 18

9:02pm Thu 17 Jul 14

Holy Roman EU says...

Labour are out of touch with the people of Bury. Vote UKIP next year. We can't afford another Labour council
Labour are out of touch with the people of Bury. Vote UKIP next year. We can't afford another Labour council Holy Roman EU
  • Score: 12

9:02pm Thu 17 Jul 14

Babbar Divino says...

Babbar Divino wrote:
"........we will continue to offer large families the chance to apply for a second grey bin if they can show they are recycling everything......"

1. How do you demonstrate this to qualify? How many bin nazis will be employed to verify this and what is the cost?
2. Why are they called Council Bosses? They are elected representatives of the people implementing the peoples will (or not) :)

The big issue here is the recycling process. It's was too complicated and now it's even more complicated. 4 bins with different emptying schedules. You need to be a logistics expert to work out which bins to put out.

There are other western countries where there are 2 bins. 1 for household waste and 1 for recycling (cardboard, plastic, glass etc.). These bins are emptied weekly in rotation ie. Week 1 household, week 2 recycling.

Would you be surprised to know that the recycling rates of these countries are higher than the UK?

It's not rocket science even though the loonie Councillors (AKA Council Bosses) try and make it so.
Sorry my mistake. The bin collections of other western countries with higher recycling rates are:
1x bin household waste - Collected weekly
1x bin recycle (cardboard, plastic, glass etc) - Collected every other week
1x bin garden waste - Collected every other week in rotation with the recycle

There is also the opportunity to get an additional recycle or garden waste bin FREE if requested

Regardless much simpler and more effective
[quote][p][bold]Babbar Divino[/bold] wrote: "........we will continue to offer large families the chance to apply for a second grey bin if they can show they are recycling everything......" 1. How do you demonstrate this to qualify? How many bin nazis will be employed to verify this and what is the cost? 2. Why are they called Council Bosses? They are elected representatives of the people implementing the peoples will (or not) :) The big issue here is the recycling process. It's was too complicated and now it's even more complicated. 4 bins with different emptying schedules. You need to be a logistics expert to work out which bins to put out. There are other western countries where there are 2 bins. 1 for household waste and 1 for recycling (cardboard, plastic, glass etc.). These bins are emptied weekly in rotation ie. Week 1 household, week 2 recycling. Would you be surprised to know that the recycling rates of these countries are higher than the UK? It's not rocket science even though the loonie Councillors (AKA Council Bosses) try and make it so.[/p][/quote]Sorry my mistake. The bin collections of other western countries with higher recycling rates are: 1x bin household waste - Collected weekly 1x bin recycle (cardboard, plastic, glass etc) - Collected every other week 1x bin garden waste - Collected every other week in rotation with the recycle There is also the opportunity to get an additional recycle or garden waste bin FREE if requested Regardless much simpler and more effective Babbar Divino
  • Score: 15

9:17pm Thu 17 Jul 14

woolfold123 says...

I only have a grey and green bin, no brown, no blue.

So now the pile of bin bags in my back garden will be even larger until I find time to take them to the local tip at my own cost.

At least the local foxes do there bit by ripping the bags open every few days and taking away anything edible.......they are more helpful with managing my waste than Bury Council are!
I only have a grey and green bin, no brown, no blue. So now the pile of bin bags in my back garden will be even larger until I find time to take them to the local tip at my own cost. At least the local foxes do there bit by ripping the bags open every few days and taking away anything edible.......they are more helpful with managing my waste than Bury Council are! woolfold123
  • Score: 21

11:33pm Thu 17 Jul 14

shauyblue says...

Why is everyone surprised that the council have gone against what most people want. whats going to happen to all the savings, reduction on our council tax?? I know that would be a miracle. Just remember next time u vote you do the right thing!!!
Why is everyone surprised that the council have gone against what most people want. whats going to happen to all the savings, reduction on our council tax?? I know that would be a miracle. Just remember next time u vote you do the right thing!!! shauyblue
  • Score: 12

8:29am Fri 18 Jul 14

Buryboy1986 says...

I have decided to put normal waste in my recycling bins. It will cost them even more money to get rid of it. If everyone does this then the Council will have no choice but to relent. Just put recycling on top of normal waste and they wont know until they get back to their depot.
I have decided to put normal waste in my recycling bins. It will cost them even more money to get rid of it. If everyone does this then the Council will have no choice but to relent. Just put recycling on top of normal waste and they wont know until they get back to their depot. Buryboy1986
  • Score: 12

8:56am Fri 18 Jul 14

cathcan says...

No smell if disposable nappies and animal waste are wrapped before placing in grey bin? Has this person no sense of smell? As soon as the lid is lifted to place sealed bags of rubbish in the bin the smell is overpowering after two weeks never mind three!!
In Leicestershire there is a two bin system - One for rubbish and one for recycling - easy peasy and you can pay for a garden waste bin if needed. Recycling rates in Bury would improve simply by collecting everything that has a recycle symbol on it eg:- food containers/trays. these are what fill my grey bin, margarine, ice cream, yogurt pots etc. If one council can do it why not all? It is different from one county to the next. Once again the peoples' representatives ride rough shod over the electorate so why are we surprised? I suggest the Labour councillors who pushed this through without consultation enjoy the rest of their term in office as the next elections will surely mean they will be signing on.
No smell if disposable nappies and animal waste are wrapped before placing in grey bin? Has this person no sense of smell? As soon as the lid is lifted to place sealed bags of rubbish in the bin the smell is overpowering after two weeks never mind three!! In Leicestershire there is a two bin system - One for rubbish and one for recycling - easy peasy and you can pay for a garden waste bin if needed. Recycling rates in Bury would improve simply by collecting everything that has a recycle symbol on it eg:- food containers/trays. these are what fill my grey bin, margarine, ice cream, yogurt pots etc. If one council can do it why not all? It is different from one county to the next. Once again the peoples' representatives ride rough shod over the electorate so why are we surprised? I suggest the Labour councillors who pushed this through without consultation enjoy the rest of their term in office as the next elections will surely mean they will be signing on. cathcan
  • Score: 6

9:12am Fri 18 Jul 14

forward thinker says...

I can't think of a single change that has EVER been popular, can you? Does that mean that all of the changes ever made are wrong? Of course not, it just shows that people resist change.

Obviously this move is driven by cost saving, but even if we had the most affluent council in the country, I'd still think this was a good move as it will encourage people to recycle more - though they might not like it.
I can't think of a single change that has EVER been popular, can you? Does that mean that all of the changes ever made are wrong? Of course not, it just shows that people resist change. Obviously this move is driven by cost saving, but even if we had the most affluent council in the country, I'd still think this was a good move as it will encourage people to recycle more - though they might not like it. forward thinker
  • Score: -13

11:17am Fri 18 Jul 14

birthday says...

I cannot believe the people of Bury are informed of the drastic changes in bin collections via the media, to see it on the local news before any form of consultation is despicable. I take it this was proposed at the budget meeting usually held before Aprils new council tax year, if so why was it kept secret, if it is a good thing to help make savings surly the powers that be understand they to must put in some work by chasing contractors to sign up to recycle all to products ie margarine/yoghurt pots and an abundance of packaging created by supermarkets that the council have not secured contractors to take them into true recycling - hence creating a major amount of space in the general waste bin also vastly reducing the landfill costs. I know this would mean the council staff would have to actually earn there wages by actually achieving the recycling quotas they strive to achieve by putting the local public at risk. Currently the last two years there have been a rise in pests near or in the bins with maggots and rats being high on the list of problems. The council have to take responsibility for this, and there actions wont be forgotten. As for comments that nappy and Animal waste products do not create the problem of smells even when rapped, that is RUBBISH, I have a dog and all waste products are kept in a separate bucket double bagged and only placed in the general bin on the day of collection and I can tell you it is bad, even the double bagged bucket - bleach - concentrated disinfectant doesnt shift it. Wake up council you have deliberately ignored the consultation process we all realize savings have to be made but not at the risk of the public's health remember each individual living in this country have been having to cut corners to make ends meet for quite a few years becasue of the resession which was caused by miss management of the councils/government. you are so out of order.
I cannot believe the people of Bury are informed of the drastic changes in bin collections via the media, to see it on the local news before any form of consultation is despicable. I take it this was proposed at the budget meeting usually held before Aprils new council tax year, if so why was it kept secret, if it is a good thing to help make savings surly the powers that be understand they to must put in some work by chasing contractors to sign up to recycle all to products ie margarine/yoghurt pots and an abundance of packaging created by supermarkets that the council have not secured contractors to take them into true recycling - hence creating a major amount of space in the general waste bin also vastly reducing the landfill costs. I know this would mean the council staff would have to actually earn there wages by actually achieving the recycling quotas they strive to achieve by putting the local public at risk. Currently the last two years there have been a rise in pests near or in the bins with maggots and rats being high on the list of problems. The council have to take responsibility for this, and there actions wont be forgotten. As for comments that nappy and Animal waste products do not create the problem of smells even when rapped, that is RUBBISH, I have a dog and all waste products are kept in a separate bucket double bagged and only placed in the general bin on the day of collection and I can tell you it is bad, even the double bagged bucket - bleach - concentrated disinfectant doesnt shift it. Wake up council you have deliberately ignored the consultation process we all realize savings have to be made but not at the risk of the public's health remember each individual living in this country have been having to cut corners to make ends meet for quite a few years becasue of the resession which was caused by miss management of the councils/government. you are so out of order. birthday
  • Score: 7

3:12pm Fri 18 Jul 14

ABreakFromTheNorm says...

It appears that the gob of the council on this one is Susan Southworth of Elton ward. Residents there should be mindful of this the next time they get a chance to vote. It's funny how she likes the sound of her own voice but fails to publicise the three weekly collections earlier in the year when first mooted.

Food for thought: If Bury council are heading towards being a zero waste council and recycling rates increase, would they advocate collecting bins every 4, then 5 and 6 weeks as this rate pushes towards 100%?

My advice would be to get a galvanised dustbin incinerator forunder £20 from B&Q. Burn all your waste in one of these and dump the ash in your grey bin. It saves on the number of bins you need and you don't have to remember when to put your bin out as it will take months to fill it with ash.
It appears that the gob of the council on this one is Susan Southworth of Elton ward. Residents there should be mindful of this the next time they get a chance to vote. It's funny how she likes the sound of her own voice but fails to publicise the three weekly collections earlier in the year when first mooted. Food for thought: If Bury council are heading towards being a zero waste council and recycling rates increase, would they advocate collecting bins every 4, then 5 and 6 weeks as this rate pushes towards 100%? My advice would be to get a galvanised dustbin incinerator forunder £20 from B&Q. Burn all your waste in one of these and dump the ash in your grey bin. It saves on the number of bins you need and you don't have to remember when to put your bin out as it will take months to fill it with ash. ABreakFromTheNorm
  • Score: 4

3:13pm Fri 18 Jul 14

ABreakFromTheNorm says...

It appears that the gob of the council on this one is Susan Southworth of Elton ward. Residents there should be mindful of this the next time they get a chance to vote. It's funny how she likes the sound of her own voice but fails to publicise the three weekly collections earlier in the year when first mooted.

Food for thought: If Bury council are heading towards being a zero waste council and recycling rates increase, would they advocate collecting bins every 4, then 5 and 6 weeks as this rate pushes towards 100%?

My advice would be to get a galvanised dustbin incinerator for under £20 from B&Q. Burn all your waste in one of these and dump the ash in your grey bin once cooled down (douse with water if necessary). It saves on the number of bins you need and you don't have to remember when to put your bin out as it will take months to fill it with ash.
It appears that the gob of the council on this one is Susan Southworth of Elton ward. Residents there should be mindful of this the next time they get a chance to vote. It's funny how she likes the sound of her own voice but fails to publicise the three weekly collections earlier in the year when first mooted. Food for thought: If Bury council are heading towards being a zero waste council and recycling rates increase, would they advocate collecting bins every 4, then 5 and 6 weeks as this rate pushes towards 100%? My advice would be to get a galvanised dustbin incinerator for under £20 from B&Q. Burn all your waste in one of these and dump the ash in your grey bin once cooled down (douse with water if necessary). It saves on the number of bins you need and you don't have to remember when to put your bin out as it will take months to fill it with ash. ABreakFromTheNorm
  • Score: 0

3:15pm Fri 18 Jul 14

Bury Taxpayer says...

We will offer large families a second grey bin if they can prove they're recycling all they can......just how does one prove that?

*last time I applied they send me a letter wanting to know allsorts.....includi
ng how much our income and earnings were .....(I don't see what this has got to do with them)

They wanted us to prove how many was in our household.....well myself,my wife and 5 children are all registered with (Them) so try should already know


Then there's the £30 delivery charge of the second grey bin....which is laughable ....I told them I'd collect it from Bradley Fold ....they told me I couldn't ......it's one big joke
We will offer large families a second grey bin if they can prove they're recycling all they can......just how does one prove that? *last time I applied they send me a letter wanting to know allsorts.....includi ng how much our income and earnings were .....(I don't see what this has got to do with them) They wanted us to prove how many was in our household.....well myself,my wife and 5 children are all registered with (Them) so try should already know Then there's the £30 delivery charge of the second grey bin....which is laughable ....I told them I'd collect it from Bradley Fold ....they told me I couldn't ......it's one big joke Bury Taxpayer
  • Score: 9

5:01pm Fri 18 Jul 14

Adra04778 says...

I would like to known if we who have not been allocated a brown will receive one, they need to sort this out before they start telling us to recycle, we can't do it without the tools, no doubt people will have to start burning the rubbish, not everyone can get to the tip, I think the local labor council will be losing a few votes over this, maybe they should push to change the packaging laws instead of bulling us :(
I would like to known if we who have not been allocated a brown will receive one, they need to sort this out before they start telling us to recycle, we can't do it without the tools, no doubt people will have to start burning the rubbish, not everyone can get to the tip, I think the local labor council will be losing a few votes over this, maybe they should push to change the packaging laws instead of bulling us :( Adra04778
  • Score: 1

4:41pm Sat 19 Jul 14

IanWalmersley says...

I don't understand how having a second grey bin (for larger families) will do anything about the smell?

BURY COUNCIL says the risk of infection and vermin is low. That risk may be low (and I never saw any risk assessments to support the claim but then I wasn't consulted anyway), but the risk of our gardens and yards and streets stinking in the summer months, from unemptied bins and stuff that has been dumped by other people is high, both in terms of probability and severity.

Even if every single citizen correctly uses all of the bins which now fill our gardens and back streets, it is still going to stink.

If you go on holiday and so can't put the bins out, or if for some other reason miss the collection (as human beings we might make a mistake and forget one week) then Bury Council will, upon request, provide bags. Which again will do nothing about the smell.

The issue is not how much space there is to store waste but how long it has to sit on our property until Bury Council decide to remove it.

Which is another point; Bury Council is a public servant, not a master. It is the people who decide, not the Councillors.

Bury Council needs to save £32m in 2 years. This is not the way to save £32m.

This link tells you the Bury Councillors Allowances, paid for by us.
(scroll down to page 6)
http://www.bury.gov.
uk/CHttpHandler.ashx
?id=6035&p=0

Vote wisely.
I don't understand how having a second grey bin (for larger families) will do anything about the smell? BURY COUNCIL says the risk of infection and vermin is low. That risk may be low (and I never saw any risk assessments to support the claim but then I wasn't consulted anyway), but the risk of our gardens and yards and streets stinking in the summer months, from unemptied bins and stuff that has been dumped by other people is high, both in terms of probability and severity. Even if every single citizen correctly uses all of the bins which now fill our gardens and back streets, it is still going to stink. If you go on holiday and so can't put the bins out, or if for some other reason miss the collection (as human beings we might make a mistake and forget one week) then Bury Council will, upon request, provide bags. Which again will do nothing about the smell. The issue is not how much space there is to store waste but how long it has to sit on our property until Bury Council decide to remove it. Which is another point; Bury Council is a public servant, not a master. It is the people who decide, not the Councillors. Bury Council needs to save £32m in 2 years. This is not the way to save £32m. This link tells you the Bury Councillors Allowances, paid for by us. (scroll down to page 6) http://www.bury.gov. uk/CHttpHandler.ashx ?id=6035&p=0 Vote wisely. IanWalmersley
  • Score: 2

7:35pm Sat 19 Jul 14

postivechange says...

IanWalmersley wrote:
I don't understand how having a second grey bin (for larger families) will do anything about the smell?

BURY COUNCIL says the risk of infection and vermin is low. That risk may be low (and I never saw any risk assessments to support the claim but then I wasn't consulted anyway), but the risk of our gardens and yards and streets stinking in the summer months, from unemptied bins and stuff that has been dumped by other people is high, both in terms of probability and severity.

Even if every single citizen correctly uses all of the bins which now fill our gardens and back streets, it is still going to stink.

If you go on holiday and so can't put the bins out, or if for some other reason miss the collection (as human beings we might make a mistake and forget one week) then Bury Council will, upon request, provide bags. Which again will do nothing about the smell.

The issue is not how much space there is to store waste but how long it has to sit on our property until Bury Council decide to remove it.

Which is another point; Bury Council is a public servant, not a master. It is the people who decide, not the Councillors.

Bury Council needs to save £32m in 2 years. This is not the way to save £32m.

This link tells you the Bury Councillors Allowances, paid for by us.
(scroll down to page 6)
http://www.bury.gov.

uk/CHttpHandler.ashx

?id=6035&p=0

Vote wisely.
Unfortunately your comments are wildly incorrect as you haven't and simply couldn't support this with a shed of evidence.

The comments made regarding the risk of infection and vermin are your opinions. The only causes of smell and "infection" (I still don't see infection would even occur unless residents start swilling out their bedpans in the streets) would be caused by rotting food waste - there are no changes to the frequency of this collection and we're not forced to wear face masks now. Nappies (baby and adult) and animal waste - these should be double bagged anyway regardless whether the bins are emptied weekly or monthly, that's basic common sense and the fact is this type of waste doesn't increase in odour the the longer it's left.

As for your issue with not being consulted about a change in bin collection frequency - the law does not specify how often collections must be done. Under Section 46 of the Environmental Protection Act (1990), the council can stipulate the types of receptacles and how householders should manage their waste materials correctly without consultation.
I agree with this as it would only serve to waste time and money to do so. The public would of course object to any proposals that are perceived as a reduction in services. Again the facts are collections aren't being reduced, the grey collection is being moved to three weekly only to be countered by increased recycling collections.

You mentioned about the missed collection process as you receive bags to store your waste. Generally missed collections are caused by the resident and therefore you should be expected to take responsibility for your own waste and either take it to your local recycling centre or store it sensibly. In the event the collection is missed due to local authority error they actually return and collect. However, this is the process now NOT the process when collections move to three weekly which you would of know had you taken a minute to look at the council website highlighting the changes. Missed collections will now be returned for regardless (providing there isn't a reason the collection was refused). So I'm not sure why you would need to be storing waste in your garden?!?!?!

There are too many people with too much to say but not enough understanding.
[quote][p][bold]IanWalmersley[/bold] wrote: I don't understand how having a second grey bin (for larger families) will do anything about the smell? BURY COUNCIL says the risk of infection and vermin is low. That risk may be low (and I never saw any risk assessments to support the claim but then I wasn't consulted anyway), but the risk of our gardens and yards and streets stinking in the summer months, from unemptied bins and stuff that has been dumped by other people is high, both in terms of probability and severity. Even if every single citizen correctly uses all of the bins which now fill our gardens and back streets, it is still going to stink. If you go on holiday and so can't put the bins out, or if for some other reason miss the collection (as human beings we might make a mistake and forget one week) then Bury Council will, upon request, provide bags. Which again will do nothing about the smell. The issue is not how much space there is to store waste but how long it has to sit on our property until Bury Council decide to remove it. Which is another point; Bury Council is a public servant, not a master. It is the people who decide, not the Councillors. Bury Council needs to save £32m in 2 years. This is not the way to save £32m. This link tells you the Bury Councillors Allowances, paid for by us. (scroll down to page 6) http://www.bury.gov. uk/CHttpHandler.ashx ?id=6035&p=0 Vote wisely.[/p][/quote]Unfortunately your comments are wildly incorrect as you haven't and simply couldn't support this with a shed of evidence. The comments made regarding the risk of infection and vermin are your opinions. The only causes of smell and "infection" (I still don't see infection would even occur unless residents start swilling out their bedpans in the streets) would be caused by rotting food waste - there are no changes to the frequency of this collection and we're not forced to wear face masks now. Nappies (baby and adult) and animal waste - these should be double bagged anyway regardless whether the bins are emptied weekly or monthly, that's basic common sense and the fact is this type of waste doesn't increase in odour the the longer it's left. As for your issue with not being consulted about a change in bin collection frequency - the law does not specify how often collections must be done. Under Section 46 of the Environmental Protection Act (1990), the council can stipulate the types of receptacles and how householders should manage their waste materials correctly without consultation. I agree with this as it would only serve to waste time and money to do so. The public would of course object to any proposals that are perceived as a reduction in services. Again the facts are collections aren't being reduced, the grey collection is being moved to three weekly only to be countered by increased recycling collections. You mentioned about the missed collection process as you receive bags to store your waste. Generally missed collections are caused by the resident and therefore you should be expected to take responsibility for your own waste and either take it to your local recycling centre or store it sensibly. In the event the collection is missed due to local authority error they actually return and collect. However, this is the process now NOT the process when collections move to three weekly which you would of know had you taken a minute to look at the council website highlighting the changes. Missed collections will now be returned for regardless (providing there isn't a reason the collection was refused). So I'm not sure why you would need to be storing waste in your garden?!?!?! There are too many people with too much to say but not enough understanding. postivechange
  • Score: -6

3:03am Sun 20 Jul 14

postivechange says...

Bury Taxpayer wrote:
We will offer large families a second grey bin if they can prove they're recycling all they can......just how does one prove that?

*last time I applied they send me a letter wanting to know allsorts.....includi

ng how much our income and earnings were .....(I don't see what this has got to do with them)

They wanted us to prove how many was in our household.....well myself,my wife and 5 children are all registered with (Them) so try should already know


Then there's the £30 delivery charge of the second grey bin....which is laughable ....I told them I'd collect it from Bradley Fold ....they told me I couldn't ......it's one big joke
Oh boy where do I start on this one.... income and earnings are the same thing and I can assure you these aren't taken into consideration when applying for an additional bin. However, proving how many live in a household is necessary as the council only holds records of adults over the age of 18 from either Council tax records or the electoral register so unless you're claiming benefits in which case you are not paying council tax yes it is necessary to provide proof. As for the attempt of avoiding the delivery charge - this would void the assurance that the bin had been received.
[quote][p][bold]Bury Taxpayer[/bold] wrote: We will offer large families a second grey bin if they can prove they're recycling all they can......just how does one prove that? *last time I applied they send me a letter wanting to know allsorts.....includi ng how much our income and earnings were .....(I don't see what this has got to do with them) They wanted us to prove how many was in our household.....well myself,my wife and 5 children are all registered with (Them) so try should already know Then there's the £30 delivery charge of the second grey bin....which is laughable ....I told them I'd collect it from Bradley Fold ....they told me I couldn't ......it's one big joke[/p][/quote]Oh boy where do I start on this one.... income and earnings are the same thing and I can assure you these aren't taken into consideration when applying for an additional bin. However, proving how many live in a household is necessary as the council only holds records of adults over the age of 18 from either Council tax records or the electoral register so unless you're claiming benefits in which case you are not paying council tax yes it is necessary to provide proof. As for the attempt of avoiding the delivery charge - this would void the assurance that the bin had been received. postivechange
  • Score: -3

10:00am Sun 20 Jul 14

ABreakFromTheNorm says...

IanWalmersley you really need to do some of your own research. A grey bin in direct sunlight left for 3 weeks will encourage vermine, create significant odour and most certainly result in maggot infestations. The internal temperature of one of these bins, with the lid closed, will exceed 20 degrees centigrade and on occasion reach 30 degrees. A perfect breeding ground for all germs and bacteria.

As a large proportion of food packaging is currently not recycled you still have the issue of food residues in the grey bin. You have probably never eaten a ready made lasagne but if you peel off the plastic film there is a fair amount residue. Maggot infestations can result from as little as 250 grams of food waste.

The levels of heat previously mentioned also significantly increase the level of ammonia released from nappies, bagged, double bagged or otherwise.

The correct method of disposal for these types of waste with the alternative being to leave it to sweat for 3 weeks is to burn it. This eliminates the risk of illness from bacteria carried from the resulting flies that inevitably make their way into the kitchen and completely erradicates the ammonia odour.

All the above can be found through simple searches on Google or by doing a bit of your own fact finding.

I await your response.
IanWalmersley you really need to do some of your own research. A grey bin in direct sunlight left for 3 weeks will encourage vermine, create significant odour and most certainly result in maggot infestations. The internal temperature of one of these bins, with the lid closed, will exceed 20 degrees centigrade and on occasion reach 30 degrees. A perfect breeding ground for all germs and bacteria. As a large proportion of food packaging is currently not recycled you still have the issue of food residues in the grey bin. You have probably never eaten a ready made lasagne but if you peel off the plastic film there is a fair amount residue. Maggot infestations can result from as little as 250 grams of food waste. The levels of heat previously mentioned also significantly increase the level of ammonia released from nappies, bagged, double bagged or otherwise. The correct method of disposal for these types of waste with the alternative being to leave it to sweat for 3 weeks is to burn it. This eliminates the risk of illness from bacteria carried from the resulting flies that inevitably make their way into the kitchen and completely erradicates the ammonia odour. All the above can be found through simple searches on Google or by doing a bit of your own fact finding. I await your response. ABreakFromTheNorm
  • Score: 5

10:14am Sun 20 Jul 14

ABreakFromTheNorm says...

And finally. This has been copied and pasted so forgive the lack of paragraphing.

Eric Pickles today (4 January 2014) publishes the first ever guidance on weekly bin collections, encouraging councils in England to support weekly services. The guidance also demolishes the “top 10 tall stories” that “bin barons” have used as excuses to cut the frequency of rubbish collection services.
As part of encouraging councils to deliver better services for Council Tax payers, the Local Government Secretary is supporting weekly collections by publishing examples where councils have kept weekly collections, increased recycling and made common sense efficiency savings.
The ‘bin bible’ report published today is being sent to every local authority in England, and is a direct challenge of the fortnightly bin industry. This is in strong contrast to the devolved administration in Wales which is now moving towards monthly bin collections.
Some of the myths employed by bin bureaucrats and deconstructed in the guidance include:
A move to fortnightly collections is the only way to improve recycling rates – in fact numerous councils have managed to recycle over half of all rubbish while maintaining weekly collections.
People don’t want their bins collected every week – surveys from councils have actually shown over 95% of residents agree with keeping weekly collections. Councils should listen to their residents.
Fortnightly collections will save taxpayers’ money – it is a myth that this is the only way to save money. Innovative solutions can mean councils can protect weekly collections at little or no extra cost.
Only fortnightly collections can make residents recycle – reward schemes like Windsor and Maidenhead’s are dramatically increasing recycling.
Weekly rubbish collections need to be scrapped to meet European Union regulations - government continues to support weekly rubbish collections.
This new guidance builds on steps the government has previously taken in England including:
safeguarding weekly collections for 6 million households through the Weekly Collection Support Scheme
removing Whitehall directives demanding fortnightly bin collections
supporting over 41 innovative reward schemes to back recycling
abolishing plans for new bin taxes
changing the law to scrap unfair bin fines
changing building regulations to tackle ‘bin blight’
removing powers of entry and snooping powers from bin inspectors and scrapped guidance telling people to rifle through families’ bins
Local Government Secretary Eric Pickles said:
This government is standing up for hard-working people and getting rid of barmy bin policies which made families’ lives hell.
Rubbish collections are the most visible service that people get for their £120 a month Council Tax bill. People deserve a comprehensive weekly service in return for their taxes.
We have exposed 10 false fictions fortnightly bin barons cling to as excuses for cutting services. If councils adopt this new guide as their ‘bin bible’, they will be able to save taxpayers’ money and still increase the frequency and quality of rubbish and recycling collections.
Across Britain there is a clear choice on offer. The government in England is standing up for weekly collections; by contrast, the administrations in Wales and Scotland are moving towards monthly collections.
A number of local authorities in England are already showing that innovative approaches can deliver quality services to their residents. The following are examples included in today’s government guidance that have saved weekly collections and increased recycling:
Bournemouth Borough Council – a weekly collection that has one of the best recycling rates in England. Provided increased capacity for residents to recycle and developing a reward system that will accrue points to spend locally.
Lewes District Council – has maintained a weekly collection service of residual waste while promoting innovative recycling measures including social media, local champions and competitions.
Ribble Valley Council – operates a weekly collection over the largest rural area in Lancashire who will be using the Weekly Collection Fund to divert an extra 770 tonnes of food waste away from landfill every year. The council operates a low cost, high quality service with over 90% customer satisfaction.
Further information
Ten myths busted
There is no alternative to fortnightly collections to improving recycling rates.
Fortnightly collection schemes reduce the overall amount of waste produced.
In areas with low recycling rates, introducing a fortnightly collection is the only way to change residents’ attitudes to recycling
The £250 million Weekly Collection Support Scheme will be damaging to the environment and have a disastrous impact on recycling.
People don’t want their bins emptied every week.
Other than inconveniencing residents, there are no other problems caused by a move to fortnightly collections of residual waste.
Local authorities can’t commit to weekly collections of residual waste in uncertain times.
The only option for a local authority to save money is to move to a fortnightly collection of residual waste.
The introduction of a fortnightly collection will bring significant savings to the council and in turn therefore to the Council Tax payer.
Traditional weekly rubbish collections must be scrapped to meet European Union recycling regulations.
And finally. This has been copied and pasted so forgive the lack of paragraphing. Eric Pickles today (4 January 2014) publishes the first ever guidance on weekly bin collections, encouraging councils in England to support weekly services. The guidance also demolishes the “top 10 tall stories” that “bin barons” have used as excuses to cut the frequency of rubbish collection services. As part of encouraging councils to deliver better services for Council Tax payers, the Local Government Secretary is supporting weekly collections by publishing examples where councils have kept weekly collections, increased recycling and made common sense efficiency savings. The ‘bin bible’ report published today is being sent to every local authority in England, and is a direct challenge of the fortnightly bin industry. This is in strong contrast to the devolved administration in Wales which is now moving towards monthly bin collections. Some of the myths employed by bin bureaucrats and deconstructed in the guidance include: A move to fortnightly collections is the only way to improve recycling rates – in fact numerous councils have managed to recycle over half of all rubbish while maintaining weekly collections. People don’t want their bins collected every week – surveys from councils have actually shown over 95% of residents agree with keeping weekly collections. Councils should listen to their residents. Fortnightly collections will save taxpayers’ money – it is a myth that this is the only way to save money. Innovative solutions can mean councils can protect weekly collections at little or no extra cost. Only fortnightly collections can make residents recycle – reward schemes like Windsor and Maidenhead’s are dramatically increasing recycling. Weekly rubbish collections need to be scrapped to meet European Union regulations - government continues to support weekly rubbish collections. This new guidance builds on steps the government has previously taken in England including: safeguarding weekly collections for 6 million households through the Weekly Collection Support Scheme removing Whitehall directives demanding fortnightly bin collections supporting over 41 innovative reward schemes to back recycling abolishing plans for new bin taxes changing the law to scrap unfair bin fines changing building regulations to tackle ‘bin blight’ removing powers of entry and snooping powers from bin inspectors and scrapped guidance telling people to rifle through families’ bins Local Government Secretary Eric Pickles said: This government is standing up for hard-working people and getting rid of barmy bin policies which made families’ lives hell. Rubbish collections are the most visible service that people get for their £120 a month Council Tax bill. People deserve a comprehensive weekly service in return for their taxes. We have exposed 10 false fictions fortnightly bin barons cling to as excuses for cutting services. If councils adopt this new guide as their ‘bin bible’, they will be able to save taxpayers’ money and still increase the frequency and quality of rubbish and recycling collections. Across Britain there is a clear choice on offer. The government in England is standing up for weekly collections; by contrast, the administrations in Wales and Scotland are moving towards monthly collections. A number of local authorities in England are already showing that innovative approaches can deliver quality services to their residents. The following are examples included in today’s government guidance that have saved weekly collections and increased recycling: Bournemouth Borough Council – a weekly collection that has one of the best recycling rates in England. Provided increased capacity for residents to recycle and developing a reward system that will accrue points to spend locally. Lewes District Council – has maintained a weekly collection service of residual waste while promoting innovative recycling measures including social media, local champions and competitions. Ribble Valley Council – operates a weekly collection over the largest rural area in Lancashire who will be using the Weekly Collection Fund to divert an extra 770 tonnes of food waste away from landfill every year. The council operates a low cost, high quality service with over 90% customer satisfaction. Further information Ten myths busted There is no alternative to fortnightly collections to improving recycling rates. Fortnightly collection schemes reduce the overall amount of waste produced. In areas with low recycling rates, introducing a fortnightly collection is the only way to change residents’ attitudes to recycling The £250 million Weekly Collection Support Scheme will be damaging to the environment and have a disastrous impact on recycling. People don’t want their bins emptied every week. Other than inconveniencing residents, there are no other problems caused by a move to fortnightly collections of residual waste. Local authorities can’t commit to weekly collections of residual waste in uncertain times. The only option for a local authority to save money is to move to a fortnightly collection of residual waste. The introduction of a fortnightly collection will bring significant savings to the council and in turn therefore to the Council Tax payer. Traditional weekly rubbish collections must be scrapped to meet European Union recycling regulations. ABreakFromTheNorm
  • Score: 4

11:01am Sun 20 Jul 14

IanWalmersley says...

Positivechange;
Your arrogance eclipses whatever value there may be in your opinions. E.g. "Oh boy where do I start on this one...." is the smug beginning to your reply to Bury Taxpayer above.
You begin and end your reply to me with the words;
"The comments made regarding the risk of infection and vermin are your opinions."
and
"There are too many people with too much to say but not enough understanding."
Yes god forbid anyone else should have an opinion. This is a forum for expressing opinions, of which your comments are just the same.

You wrote to me “…which you would of know had you taken a minute to look at the council website…”. How do you know how long I spent looking at the Council website?

So why do you feel the need to insult people? Does your point of view need that, are your opinions not strong enough without insults? Your points would be worth discussing, hell you might even convince us all were it not for your arrogance.

But here’s the point; like the rest of us, your opinion is just that. The public of Bury objected by a vote of 92% against 3 weekly bin collections and have repeatedly complained. Of course the LA doesn’t HAVE to consult, otherwise it would be unlawful. That it SHOULD have consulted is the issue. If you are right, if is such a good idea, then what was there to hide, why no consultation?

And rather than listen to people and win them over with the logic of your arguments you say “..it's absolutely mind blowing watching grown adults behave like spoilt children that have had a toys taken away.”

As one person replied to you;
“What saddens me is your pomposity... When you've taken your head out of the council's backside and finished telling us how ridiculous you think we are for standing up for what we believe in you should grow a back bone and get out of lala land. Stick that in your practically empty bin.”
Positivechange; Your arrogance eclipses whatever value there may be in your opinions. E.g. "Oh boy where do I start on this one...." is the smug beginning to your reply to Bury Taxpayer above. You begin and end your reply to me with the words; "The comments made regarding the risk of infection and vermin are your opinions." and "There are too many people with too much to say but not enough understanding." Yes god forbid anyone else should have an opinion. This is a forum for expressing opinions, of which your comments are just the same. You wrote to me “…which you would of know had you taken a minute to look at the council website…”. How do you know how long I spent looking at the Council website? So why do you feel the need to insult people? Does your point of view need that, are your opinions not strong enough without insults? Your points would be worth discussing, hell you might even convince us all were it not for your arrogance. But here’s the point; like the rest of us, your opinion is just that. The public of Bury objected by a vote of 92% against 3 weekly bin collections and have repeatedly complained. Of course the LA doesn’t HAVE to consult, otherwise it would be unlawful. That it SHOULD have consulted is the issue. If you are right, if is such a good idea, then what was there to hide, why no consultation? And rather than listen to people and win them over with the logic of your arguments you say “..it's absolutely mind blowing watching grown adults behave like spoilt children that have had a toys taken away.” As one person replied to you; “What saddens me is your pomposity... When you've taken your head out of the council's backside and finished telling us how ridiculous you think we are for standing up for what we believe in you should grow a back bone and get out of lala land. Stick that in your practically empty bin.” IanWalmersley
  • Score: 8

11:16am Sun 20 Jul 14

IanWalmersley says...

ABreakFromTheNorm wrote:
IanWalmersley you really need to do some of your own research. A grey bin in direct sunlight left for 3 weeks will encourage vermine, create significant odour and most certainly result in maggot infestations. The internal temperature of one of these bins, with the lid closed, will exceed 20 degrees centigrade and on occasion reach 30 degrees. A perfect breeding ground for all germs and bacteria.

As a large proportion of food packaging is currently not recycled you still have the issue of food residues in the grey bin. You have probably never eaten a ready made lasagne but if you peel off the plastic film there is a fair amount residue. Maggot infestations can result from as little as 250 grams of food waste.

The levels of heat previously mentioned also significantly increase the level of ammonia released from nappies, bagged, double bagged or otherwise.

The correct method of disposal for these types of waste with the alternative being to leave it to sweat for 3 weeks is to burn it. This eliminates the risk of illness from bacteria carried from the resulting flies that inevitably make their way into the kitchen and completely erradicates the ammonia odour.

All the above can be found through simple searches on Google or by doing a bit of your own fact finding.

I await your response.
ABreakFromTheNorm

Is your comment addressed to me or someone else?

That is the point I try to make. My views were in response to the info presented on Bury.gov.uk and I have not seen the evidence supporting the claims on there that there is no risk of infection and vermin.

Just going off what I know from experience, yes, bins smell and that the longer they are left the worse the smell gets. Not just grey bins, but recycling bins. Unless I sterilise every bottle which goes in the blue bin, there is always slimy gunk on the bottom which I hose out and bleach every month or so.

I have eaten many a ready meal lasagne (!) that's why the view that if only everyone recycled everything then there would be no problem, is ridiculous. 100% of the people are not going to recycle 100% of their waste 100% of the time. That will result in smelly bins, gardens and backstreets. There will be people dumping their rubbish on the streets or in other people's bins. People will hide waste in the other bins, green, brown, blue whatever. It will happen because people are telling us this is what they will do.

Bags in streets = vermin. How much research do we need!

Back to food residue on lids; I remember at school we were told not to drop litter because, apparently a mouse could live for a week on the contents left inside an empty crisp packet! I don't know how true that was but it made us think.

Thanks for the second post re; collections. I will read that now.
[quote][p][bold]ABreakFromTheNorm[/bold] wrote: IanWalmersley you really need to do some of your own research. A grey bin in direct sunlight left for 3 weeks will encourage vermine, create significant odour and most certainly result in maggot infestations. The internal temperature of one of these bins, with the lid closed, will exceed 20 degrees centigrade and on occasion reach 30 degrees. A perfect breeding ground for all germs and bacteria. As a large proportion of food packaging is currently not recycled you still have the issue of food residues in the grey bin. You have probably never eaten a ready made lasagne but if you peel off the plastic film there is a fair amount residue. Maggot infestations can result from as little as 250 grams of food waste. The levels of heat previously mentioned also significantly increase the level of ammonia released from nappies, bagged, double bagged or otherwise. The correct method of disposal for these types of waste with the alternative being to leave it to sweat for 3 weeks is to burn it. This eliminates the risk of illness from bacteria carried from the resulting flies that inevitably make their way into the kitchen and completely erradicates the ammonia odour. All the above can be found through simple searches on Google or by doing a bit of your own fact finding. I await your response.[/p][/quote]ABreakFromTheNorm Is your comment addressed to me or someone else? That is the point I try to make. My views were in response to the info presented on Bury.gov.uk and I have not seen the evidence supporting the claims on there that there is no risk of infection and vermin. Just going off what I know from experience, yes, bins smell and that the longer they are left the worse the smell gets. Not just grey bins, but recycling bins. Unless I sterilise every bottle which goes in the blue bin, there is always slimy gunk on the bottom which I hose out and bleach every month or so. I have eaten many a ready meal lasagne (!) that's why the view that if only everyone recycled everything then there would be no problem, is ridiculous. 100% of the people are not going to recycle 100% of their waste 100% of the time. That will result in smelly bins, gardens and backstreets. There will be people dumping their rubbish on the streets or in other people's bins. People will hide waste in the other bins, green, brown, blue whatever. It will happen because people are telling us this is what they will do. Bags in streets = vermin. How much research do we need! Back to food residue on lids; I remember at school we were told not to drop litter because, apparently a mouse could live for a week on the contents left inside an empty crisp packet! I don't know how true that was but it made us think. Thanks for the second post re; collections. I will read that now. IanWalmersley
  • Score: 3

12:52pm Sun 20 Jul 14

ABreakFromTheNorm says...

Ian, sincere apologies. My post was aimed at Positive Change, my eyesight isn't what it was and I'm using a phone with a small screen.
Ian, sincere apologies. My post was aimed at Positive Change, my eyesight isn't what it was and I'm using a phone with a small screen. ABreakFromTheNorm
  • Score: 2

8:04am Mon 21 Jul 14

Adra04778 says...

We have just suffered an out break of maggots in out grey bin it was awful, i used 6 full tubos of salt trying to kill them and they just kept coming back, eventually we had to empty the bin and burn all the content in the garden, what I don't understand is the fact that everything food wise was wrapped in newspaper and all in black bags . If this happens. again it will be left for the bin collectors to deal with, it's is horrid they just grew and grew, the whole bin was covered in thousands of the maggots. :( imagine if that was an older person who couldn't or didn't know how to deal with it. I think the council really need to think again, as do the do gooders or maybe they could be the ones who go around sorting out the vermin and maggots when people get infested.
We have just suffered an out break of maggots in out grey bin it was awful, i used 6 full tubos of salt trying to kill them and they just kept coming back, eventually we had to empty the bin and burn all the content in the garden, what I don't understand is the fact that everything food wise was wrapped in newspaper and all in black bags . If this happens. again it will be left for the bin collectors to deal with, it's is horrid they just grew and grew, the whole bin was covered in thousands of the maggots. :( imagine if that was an older person who couldn't or didn't know how to deal with it. I think the council really need to think again, as do the do gooders or maybe they could be the ones who go around sorting out the vermin and maggots when people get infested. Adra04778
  • Score: 6

12:18am Wed 23 Jul 14

itstheirfault says...

Buryboy1986 wrote:
I have decided to put normal waste in my recycling bins. It will cost them even more money to get rid of it. If everyone does this then the Council will have no choice but to relent. Just put recycling on top of normal waste and they wont know until they get back to their depot.
I suggest that all residents of Bury who wish for.their waste to be dealt with by the council as though it was still the 1970's contact the council and advise them they can create a landfill site in their back garden or they are happy for an incinerator to be built next door.

Sadly the government's landfill tax may scupper these plans rather than the councils ideas of asking each resident to take some responsibility for their own rubbish.

The suggestion that four recycling bins emptied on a three week cycle is somehow a logistical nightmare is ludicrous when also considering the council supply a calendar of collection dates with lovely pictures of the bins to be collected.

The Dutch seem to manage and can even separate rubbish in litter bins in the street, but then.maybe we're just a bit thick.
[quote][p][bold]Buryboy1986[/bold] wrote: I have decided to put normal waste in my recycling bins. It will cost them even more money to get rid of it. If everyone does this then the Council will have no choice but to relent. Just put recycling on top of normal waste and they wont know until they get back to their depot.[/p][/quote]I suggest that all residents of Bury who wish for.their waste to be dealt with by the council as though it was still the 1970's contact the council and advise them they can create a landfill site in their back garden or they are happy for an incinerator to be built next door. Sadly the government's landfill tax may scupper these plans rather than the councils ideas of asking each resident to take some responsibility for their own rubbish. The suggestion that four recycling bins emptied on a three week cycle is somehow a logistical nightmare is ludicrous when also considering the council supply a calendar of collection dates with lovely pictures of the bins to be collected. The Dutch seem to manage and can even separate rubbish in litter bins in the street, but then.maybe we're just a bit thick. itstheirfault
  • Score: -1

10:33am Thu 24 Jul 14

forward thinker says...

Adra04778 wrote:
We have just suffered an out break of maggots in out grey bin it was awful, i used 6 full tubos of salt trying to kill them and they just kept coming back, eventually we had to empty the bin and burn all the content in the garden, what I don't understand is the fact that everything food wise was wrapped in newspaper and all in black bags . If this happens. again it will be left for the bin collectors to deal with, it's is horrid they just grew and grew, the whole bin was covered in thousands of the maggots. :( imagine if that was an older person who couldn't or didn't know how to deal with it. I think the council really need to think again, as do the do gooders or maybe they could be the ones who go around sorting out the vermin and maggots when people get infested.
I've made several comments in support of the 3 week collection, but I too have seen maggots in my bin, but they can only possibly exist in your brown bin if you are using that for food waste correctly. If you don't put food waste in your grey bin then you won't have maggots in it.

I'm reminded of the Simpsons episode where Homer is put in charge of Springfield's waste. He promises lots of collections but has no idea of how to budget or achieve them... chaos ensues.

At the simplest level, something needs to change, collecting one of our 4 bins every 3 weeks instead of 2 is a straight forward change. If you are so upset about it then please suggest a preferable alternative.
[quote][p][bold]Adra04778[/bold] wrote: We have just suffered an out break of maggots in out grey bin it was awful, i used 6 full tubos of salt trying to kill them and they just kept coming back, eventually we had to empty the bin and burn all the content in the garden, what I don't understand is the fact that everything food wise was wrapped in newspaper and all in black bags . If this happens. again it will be left for the bin collectors to deal with, it's is horrid they just grew and grew, the whole bin was covered in thousands of the maggots. :( imagine if that was an older person who couldn't or didn't know how to deal with it. I think the council really need to think again, as do the do gooders or maybe they could be the ones who go around sorting out the vermin and maggots when people get infested.[/p][/quote]I've made several comments in support of the 3 week collection, but I too have seen maggots in my bin, but they can only possibly exist in your brown bin if you are using that for food waste correctly. If you don't put food waste in your grey bin then you won't have maggots in it. I'm reminded of the Simpsons episode where Homer is put in charge of Springfield's waste. He promises lots of collections but has no idea of how to budget or achieve them... chaos ensues. At the simplest level, something needs to change, collecting one of our 4 bins every 3 weeks instead of 2 is a straight forward change. If you are so upset about it then please suggest a preferable alternative. forward thinker
  • Score: -3

12:29pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Adra04778 says...

My alternative would be for personally that they give me a brown bin which we are not allocated, I have asked the town hall and I am still waiting for a reply after several email and phone calls, my address is allocated a brown bin, the lady told me but for some reason we don't have one, and my neighbors are not allocated one, so there for they don't give us one either, the property's where we are do not have brown bins, I have a big garden and currently go to the dano every 2 weeks, I do not want to have to go more, and as you say I would put food waste in a brown bin if only I had one :(
My alternative would be for personally that they give me a brown bin which we are not allocated, I have asked the town hall and I am still waiting for a reply after several email and phone calls, my address is allocated a brown bin, the lady told me but for some reason we don't have one, and my neighbors are not allocated one, so there for they don't give us one either, the property's where we are do not have brown bins, I have a big garden and currently go to the dano every 2 weeks, I do not want to have to go more, and as you say I would put food waste in a brown bin if only I had one :( Adra04778
  • Score: 2

2:32pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Sighthound6 says...

It wouldn't be so difficult if Bury MBC were not so picky about what can be recycled. For example, you can recycle the 'wrong kind' of plastic. Nor many types of metal. These have to go in the grey bin.

I am all for recycling. I don't mind sorting out stuff, and do it on a regular basis. But there must be a better, more practical way.
It wouldn't be so difficult if Bury MBC were not so picky about what can be recycled. For example, you can recycle the 'wrong kind' of plastic. Nor many types of metal. These have to go in the grey bin. I am all for recycling. I don't mind sorting out stuff, and do it on a regular basis. But there must be a better, more practical way. Sighthound6
  • Score: 2

2:33pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Sighthound6 says...

Sorry should be 'can't recycle'. Pity there isn't an editing feature...
Sorry should be 'can't recycle'. Pity there isn't an editing feature... Sighthound6
  • Score: 0

3:56pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Adra04778 says...

One week our blue bin was not emptied, it turned out that because we had put plastic bags in it, that said on them they were recyclable, they wouldn't empty it, I found that really strange and must admit loss a lot of interest in recycling after that, the dustmen said that the company don't want them in the bins, so yes I also think it needs to clearer and more organized before they go ahead with the plans, also I have been told that a lot of recycled stuff just goes into land fills even after people have recycled , personally my concern is the vermin, when the bins are over flowing the foxes access them with ease, and foxes no longer are only found in the countryside. Also the people who dump the rubbish everywhere will just do it more, causing a bigger problem for those of us who do follow the rules. If the give me a brown bin and empty all 4 on the same day so we are trying to remember which day is which and which color goes out when, then I will be happy to see how it goes, although having said that I would be surprised if the labour council would reverse the decision they have made anyway.
One week our blue bin was not emptied, it turned out that because we had put plastic bags in it, that said on them they were recyclable, they wouldn't empty it, I found that really strange and must admit loss a lot of interest in recycling after that, the dustmen said that the company don't want them in the bins, so yes I also think it needs to clearer and more organized before they go ahead with the plans, also I have been told that a lot of recycled stuff just goes into land fills even after people have recycled , personally my concern is the vermin, when the bins are over flowing the foxes access them with ease, and foxes no longer are only found in the countryside. Also the people who dump the rubbish everywhere will just do it more, causing a bigger problem for those of us who do follow the rules. If the give me a brown bin and empty all 4 on the same day so we are trying to remember which day is which and which color goes out when, then I will be happy to see how it goes, although having said that I would be surprised if the labour council would reverse the decision they have made anyway. Adra04778
  • Score: 3

12:01pm Tue 29 Jul 14

forward thinker says...

We're going to be trail blazers for the rest of the country according to this http://www.bbc.co.uk
/news/science-enviro
nment-28475146
We're going to be trail blazers for the rest of the country according to this http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/science-enviro nment-28475146 forward thinker
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