Supermarket jobs under threat in East Lancashire

This Is Lancashire: Supermarket jobs under threat in East Lancashire Supermarket jobs under threat in East Lancashire

SUPERMARKET management jobs in East Lancashire could be under threat, after both Asda and Morrisons announced plans to cut staff.
Asda has announced a shake-up of its management structure, which is likely to result in 1,360 redundancies nationwide.
The supermarket chain first set out the plans in May, and had initially forecast that up to 2,600 people would lose their jobs.
Morrisons has also confirmed plans to cut 2,600 store management jobs as part of a restructuring, affecting 15,000 staff.
Asda chief executive, Andy Clarke, said: “As much as it is my job, and privilege, to be CEO of this business and to do what is right for Asda as a whole, this is one of the most difficult decisions I’ve had to make. Whilst I genuinely believe that it is the right decision for the future of Asda, knowing that it will result in valued colleagues leaving us is not easy.
“Every supermarket must adapt to the intense changes in UK retailing or they will get left behind. We spotted this nearly two years ago, responding with a new strategy and taking time to thoroughly examine our structures, test scenarios, talk to our colleagues and adjust our proposals accordingly. This thorough process has helped us to reach this difficult decision today.”
A spokesman for Morrisons said it was as yet unclear which stores in East Lancashire, if any, will be affected.
Dalton Philips, Morrisons chief executive, said: “This is the right time to modernise the way our stores are managed. These changes will improve our focus on customers and lead to simpler, smarter ways of working.
“We know that moving to the new management structure will mean uncertainty for our colleagues and we will be supporting them through the process.”
Trade Unions have expressed concerns over the proposals.
Joanne McGuinness, Usdaw’s National Officer representing Morrison’s workers, said: “The next few weeks will be a worrying time for our members in Morrison’s and we will do everything possible to support them.
“Our priority will be to safeguard as many jobs as possible, maximise employment within the business and get the best possible outcome for our members affected by this restructuring.”

Comments (16)

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1:53pm Sat 5 Jul 14

Can we take a step back says...

Anybody else noticed that these highly paid CEO's announce company restructures that involve job losses on this scale and they are full of remorse for the people affected.
It never seems to be followed by "and of course my pay will obviously be REDUCED by "X%" to reflect the fact that I have not succeeded in my job and am now in charge of a smaller company"
Anybody else noticed that these highly paid CEO's announce company restructures that involve job losses on this scale and they are full of remorse for the people affected. It never seems to be followed by "and of course my pay will obviously be REDUCED by "X%" to reflect the fact that I have not succeeded in my job and am now in charge of a smaller company" Can we take a step back
  • Score: 51

2:27pm Sat 5 Jul 14

shytalk says...

All these job losses are down to the recovery they keep telling us about but is not really happening.
All these job losses are down to the recovery they keep telling us about but is not really happening. shytalk
  • Score: 30

2:32pm Sat 5 Jul 14

Michael@ClitheroeSince58 says...

shytalk wrote:
All these job losses are down to the recovery they keep telling us about but is not really happening.
It's more because when I shop at ASDA it seems to cost me around 60 to 70 pounds for my junk food, fridge stuff, biscuits etc. But if I buy the same things at Lidl it only ever seems to cost about 15 pounds. Guess where I buy most of it from these days.
[quote][p][bold]shytalk[/bold] wrote: All these job losses are down to the recovery they keep telling us about but is not really happening.[/p][/quote]It's more because when I shop at ASDA it seems to cost me around 60 to 70 pounds for my junk food, fridge stuff, biscuits etc. But if I buy the same things at Lidl it only ever seems to cost about 15 pounds. Guess where I buy most of it from these days. Michael@ClitheroeSince58
  • Score: 33

2:38pm Sat 5 Jul 14

Samantha ;) says...

Michael@ClitheroeSin
ce58
wrote:
shytalk wrote:
All these job losses are down to the recovery they keep telling us about but is not really happening.
It's more because when I shop at ASDA it seems to cost me around 60 to 70 pounds for my junk food, fridge stuff, biscuits etc. But if I buy the same things at Lidl it only ever seems to cost about 15 pounds. Guess where I buy most of it from these days.
Don't shop there then :/
[quote][p][bold]Michael@ClitheroeSin ce58[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]shytalk[/bold] wrote: All these job losses are down to the recovery they keep telling us about but is not really happening.[/p][/quote]It's more because when I shop at ASDA it seems to cost me around 60 to 70 pounds for my junk food, fridge stuff, biscuits etc. But if I buy the same things at Lidl it only ever seems to cost about 15 pounds. Guess where I buy most of it from these days.[/p][/quote]Don't shop there then :/ Samantha ;)
  • Score: -11

2:41pm Sat 5 Jul 14

Michael@ClitheroeSince58 says...

Samantha ;) wrote:
Michael@ClitheroeSin

ce58
wrote:
shytalk wrote:
All these job losses are down to the recovery they keep telling us about but is not really happening.
It's more because when I shop at ASDA it seems to cost me around 60 to 70 pounds for my junk food, fridge stuff, biscuits etc. But if I buy the same things at Lidl it only ever seems to cost about 15 pounds. Guess where I buy most of it from these days.
Don't shop there then :/
I still call in at ASDA when I'm out and about just take a bit more care what I buy :)
[quote][p][bold]Samantha ;)[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Michael@ClitheroeSin ce58[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]shytalk[/bold] wrote: All these job losses are down to the recovery they keep telling us about but is not really happening.[/p][/quote]It's more because when I shop at ASDA it seems to cost me around 60 to 70 pounds for my junk food, fridge stuff, biscuits etc. But if I buy the same things at Lidl it only ever seems to cost about 15 pounds. Guess where I buy most of it from these days.[/p][/quote]Don't shop there then :/[/p][/quote]I still call in at ASDA when I'm out and about just take a bit more care what I buy :) Michael@ClitheroeSince58
  • Score: 11

3:35pm Sat 5 Jul 14

woolywords says...

I cannot speak for the two supermarkets here but can relate my experience at Tesco.
Once over, if there was a queue of three or more at checkouts, they opened more. Of late, they put a call out over the Tannoy for supervisors to go to them. Not to operate a till though, they just stand there, watching.
As a result of this, I no longer shop there. Like many others, I go where my custom is valued with decent service. A lot of these stores have unnecessary levels of management, that all has to be paid for, by the customer.
...
I have noticed that Morrisons have reduced the numbers of lines that they carry; whereas ASDA still has that, 'pile it high' mentality, where money is being tied up, in stock! It just begs the question, how much of that perishable stock goes to waste, that I'm expected to pay for, in the other lines?
I cannot speak for the two supermarkets here but can relate my experience at Tesco. Once over, if there was a queue of three or more at checkouts, they opened more. Of late, they put a call out over the Tannoy for supervisors to go to them. Not to operate a till though, they just stand there, watching. As a result of this, I no longer shop there. Like many others, I go where my custom is valued with decent service. A lot of these stores have unnecessary levels of management, that all has to be paid for, by the customer. ... I have noticed that Morrisons have reduced the numbers of lines that they carry; whereas ASDA still has that, 'pile it high' mentality, where money is being tied up, in stock! It just begs the question, how much of that perishable stock goes to waste, that I'm expected to pay for, in the other lines? woolywords
  • Score: 20

4:02pm Sat 5 Jul 14

juanbbien says...

Maybe the problem is that we have become a nation of supermarkets and no proper industry for the young people,and who have we to thank a certain women called Thatcher
Maybe the problem is that we have become a nation of supermarkets and no proper industry for the young people,and who have we to thank a certain women called Thatcher juanbbien
  • Score: -10

10:12pm Sat 5 Jul 14

Eric Shawn says...

Their idea of doing bad is.... we made £200 million last time, we have only made £180 million this time. OMG !
Their idea of doing bad is.... we made £200 million last time, we have only made £180 million this time. OMG ! Eric Shawn
  • Score: 15

11:15pm Sat 5 Jul 14

the beaver says...

juanbbien wrote:
Maybe the problem is that we have become a nation of supermarkets and no proper industry for the young people,and who have we to thank a certain women called Thatcher
And yet I bet you have not done a days work in your life yet still expect a living wage in benefits.
[quote][p][bold]juanbbien[/bold] wrote: Maybe the problem is that we have become a nation of supermarkets and no proper industry for the young people,and who have we to thank a certain women called Thatcher[/p][/quote]And yet I bet you have not done a days work in your life yet still expect a living wage in benefits. the beaver
  • Score: -4

7:10am Sun 6 Jul 14

jenkinsroy says...

Well we know what the government will say YES?
UNEMPLOYMENT IS DOWN AGAIN PRAISES
BE TO US BOW DOWN TO YOUR KIND GOVERNMENT
THAT LOOK AFTER YOU ALL? WHAT LORD OF CRAP
Why are they cutting job well I think it is something to do
With the government coming up with another plane to give
The shareholders of all firms a tax break the only way to get
It is to have so much in the shareholders pot?
By this I mean if you have £500.000 in the pot?
With all the things put together in the business you will
NOT get the tax break?
But the government will only let you have a tax break if you have
In your pot is £600.000 so to get the differences in the pot you must
Close stores or sack staff so the boards of ASDA/MORRISON STORES
Have gone for the cut wage bills and sack the staff sorted? sack staff
NOW WE can apply for the big tax cuts the government will give us?
Thank you David and George from Asda and Morrison BOSSES.
See you at the party we will give you some funding for the 2015
Elections? As it will cost us nothing now.
Well we know what the government will say YES? UNEMPLOYMENT IS DOWN AGAIN PRAISES BE TO US BOW DOWN TO YOUR KIND GOVERNMENT THAT LOOK AFTER YOU ALL? WHAT LORD OF CRAP Why are they cutting job well I think it is something to do With the government coming up with another plane to give The shareholders of all firms a tax break the only way to get It is to have so much in the shareholders pot? By this I mean if you have £500.000 in the pot? With all the things put together in the business you will NOT get the tax break? But the government will only let you have a tax break if you have In your pot is £600.000 so to get the differences in the pot you must Close stores or sack staff so the boards of ASDA/MORRISON STORES Have gone for the cut wage bills and sack the staff sorted? sack staff NOW WE can apply for the big tax cuts the government will give us? Thank you David and George from Asda and Morrison BOSSES. See you at the party we will give you some funding for the 2015 Elections? As it will cost us nothing now. jenkinsroy
  • Score: 8

8:35am Sun 6 Jul 14

Kevin, Colne says...

Not good news for the staff affected and one hopes that the alterations can be made with as little pain as possible.

For the best part of three decades the supermarkets engaged in a space-race by building more and larger sheds.

Burnley and Pendle tells the story. Thirty years ago Asda at Colne and the Co-Op in Burnley were the only game in town. Then came: Sainsbury in Burnley, Morrison at Nelson, Asda at Burnley, bigger Sainsbury at Burnley, bigger Asda at Colne, Tesco at Burnley and Padiham, and finally Sainsbury at Colne. In a few months time there will Booths at Barrowford.

They did all of this with the aid of an economic tail-wind. Management claimed that they were super-smart, although a good deal of their perceived smartness amounted to luck in my honest opinion.

The game has changed and the sun is setting on the glory days of old.

Since the start of The Great Recession the supermarkets have been battling head-winds in the form of customers failing incomes in real terms, which has produced a marked shift in shopping behaviour; and technological advance in the form of internet shopping which is growing at a prodigious rate.

From what I can see the top-end and the hard discounters are thriving, while the mid-market players look as though they have hit the buffers. One notes the shift to internet and convenience store shopping but I wonder whether this is merely existing customers using different channels rather than additional custom.

Over recent years our food shopping habits have changed markedly, but whether we are typical I can’t say. We source more produce locally in town, we’re no longer loyal to one supermarket, we undertake a large shop every fortnight instead of weekly and when we do we put fewer items in the basket, and we visit supermarkets more often on a drop-in basis looking for bargains – items reduced in price for quick sale.

We must be the supermarkets worst nightmare: disloyal and unpredictable. Perhaps the truth is that finally we’ve come to our senses.
Not good news for the staff affected and one hopes that the alterations can be made with as little pain as possible. For the best part of three decades the supermarkets engaged in a space-race by building more and larger sheds. Burnley and Pendle tells the story. Thirty years ago Asda at Colne and the Co-Op in Burnley were the only game in town. Then came: Sainsbury in Burnley, Morrison at Nelson, Asda at Burnley, bigger Sainsbury at Burnley, bigger Asda at Colne, Tesco at Burnley and Padiham, and finally Sainsbury at Colne. In a few months time there will Booths at Barrowford. They did all of this with the aid of an economic tail-wind. Management claimed that they were super-smart, although a good deal of their perceived smartness amounted to luck in my honest opinion. The game has changed and the sun is setting on the glory days of old. Since the start of The Great Recession the supermarkets have been battling head-winds in the form of customers failing incomes in real terms, which has produced a marked shift in shopping behaviour; and technological advance in the form of internet shopping which is growing at a prodigious rate. From what I can see the top-end and the hard discounters are thriving, while the mid-market players look as though they have hit the buffers. One notes the shift to internet and convenience store shopping but I wonder whether this is merely existing customers using different channels rather than additional custom. Over recent years our food shopping habits have changed markedly, but whether we are typical I can’t say. We source more produce locally in town, we’re no longer loyal to one supermarket, we undertake a large shop every fortnight instead of weekly and when we do we put fewer items in the basket, and we visit supermarkets more often on a drop-in basis looking for bargains – items reduced in price for quick sale. We must be the supermarkets worst nightmare: disloyal and unpredictable. Perhaps the truth is that finally we’ve come to our senses. Kevin, Colne
  • Score: 18

8:43am Sun 6 Jul 14

Noiticer says...

Savvy shoppers are voting with their feet and marching to Lidl and Aldi where the produce on offer is of good quality and the pricing is clear and reductions honest.
Savvy shoppers are voting with their feet and marching to Lidl and Aldi where the produce on offer is of good quality and the pricing is clear and reductions honest. Noiticer
  • Score: 14

10:01am Sun 6 Jul 14

coates warder says...

go to aldi their checkout people just throw your goods at you no time to pack with them scowling at you to hurry up and ask for a certain line with someone on the shop floor you are growled at dont know im busy .maybe paying a bit more for helpful staff maywell be worth it .id rather shop where i seem appreshiated not looked upon as im actually inconveiniancing the the staff like at aldi
go to aldi their checkout people just throw your goods at you no time to pack with them scowling at you to hurry up and ask for a certain line with someone on the shop floor you are growled at dont know im busy .maybe paying a bit more for helpful staff maywell be worth it .id rather shop where i seem appreshiated not looked upon as im actually inconveiniancing the the staff like at aldi coates warder
  • Score: -8

10:28am Sun 6 Jul 14

FingerzUK says...

Aldi, Farmfoods and Lidl (in that order) currently have the biggest sales growth year on year and for good reason. The "big five" are losing custom hand over foot, firstly due to the economy but now fuelled by the recognition that the discounters are giving not only competitive pricing, but quality and service too. The discounters do have to run very lean to achieve this and Aldi in particular (in my opinion) do perhaps neglect the customer service aspect but just look at their results....Personall
y, I would prefer to queue at a checkout for a considerable saving rather than queue in a hypermarket with a girl pointing a wooden sign at the smallest queue....Should she not be on a checkout? I am sure I can find the smallest queue myself! Although I feel sorry for the redundant staff (I am a retailer myself), the companies are at fault initially for the extra fat they have taken onboard and now need to release to survive.
Aldi, Farmfoods and Lidl (in that order) currently have the biggest sales growth year on year and for good reason. The "big five" are losing custom hand over foot, firstly due to the economy but now fuelled by the recognition that the discounters are giving not only competitive pricing, but quality and service too. The discounters do have to run very lean to achieve this and Aldi in particular (in my opinion) do perhaps neglect the customer service aspect but just look at their results....Personall y, I would prefer to queue at a checkout for a considerable saving rather than queue in a hypermarket with a girl pointing a wooden sign at the smallest queue....Should she not be on a checkout? I am sure I can find the smallest queue myself! Although I feel sorry for the redundant staff (I am a retailer myself), the companies are at fault initially for the extra fat they have taken onboard and now need to release to survive. FingerzUK
  • Score: 11

3:17pm Sun 6 Jul 14

juanbbien says...

the beaver wrote:
juanbbien wrote:
Maybe the problem is that we have become a nation of supermarkets and no proper industry for the young people,and who have we to thank a certain women called Thatcher
And yet I bet you have not done a days work in your life yet still expect a living wage in benefits.
After forty five years of working fifty hours or more per week I'm enjoying my retirement,but I'm saying for those who choose to work the skilled opportunities in and around this area are few.are you always as rude in your correspondance and assumptions
[quote][p][bold]the beaver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]juanbbien[/bold] wrote: Maybe the problem is that we have become a nation of supermarkets and no proper industry for the young people,and who have we to thank a certain women called Thatcher[/p][/quote]And yet I bet you have not done a days work in your life yet still expect a living wage in benefits.[/p][/quote]After forty five years of working fifty hours or more per week I'm enjoying my retirement,but I'm saying for those who choose to work the skilled opportunities in and around this area are few.are you always as rude in your correspondance and assumptions juanbbien
  • Score: 9

12:21am Wed 9 Jul 14

Darwen Malc says...

juanbbien wrote:
Maybe the problem is that we have become a nation of supermarkets and no proper industry for the young people,and who have we to thank a certain women called Thatcher
Utter Tosh, the Unions brought about the downfall of industry, not Mrs T.
[quote][p][bold]juanbbien[/bold] wrote: Maybe the problem is that we have become a nation of supermarkets and no proper industry for the young people,and who have we to thank a certain women called Thatcher[/p][/quote]Utter Tosh, the Unions brought about the downfall of industry, not Mrs T. Darwen Malc
  • Score: 0
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