Graduate driving licence would save lives, say Bolton motoring experts

An overturned car after a crash

An overturned car after a crash

First published in News
Last updated

A PROPOSED graduate driving licence which would bar young motorists from carrying passengers or driving at night would be a “big help”, according to the Bolton branch of a road safety charity.

Gary Whittle, from the Bolton Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM), said the move could save the lives of young drivers and their passengers, as well as cut the cost of their insurance premiums.

Currently, anyone can obtain a provisional driving licence and start learning when they are 17, and there are no restrictions in place relating to experience once someone has passed.

Mr Whittle said: “We have supported this for some years and think it would be a very good idea.

“There are too many young men getting their licence and then going out on country roads, killing themselves and their passengers.

“Their car insurance would also be a lot cheaper and it is almost prohibitively expensive for young people to get insurance these days.

“Obviously it would be best if everyone who had just passed their test had these restrictions imposed on them, but it is younger people who are predominantly driving recklessly.”

In June last year a bill was put before parliament calling for new licences to last just 12 months, with drivers expected to take advanced tests during that period, as well as carrying only one passenger and having their licence automatically revoked if they amass six penalty points.

The RAC Foundation has also recommended such proposals are adopted, including making drivers learn for 12 months before they take their test and placing them on a two-year probationary period once they have passed.

Comments (15)

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11:53am Wed 28 May 14

BlueRay79 says...

Should have been introduced years ago! I also think they should have age and vehicle categories like on a motorbike. You can't just jump on to a large motorbike now, as you have to start on a 50cc at 16 and work your way up.

I think all new young drivers should start of in a 1ltr car. It didn't do me any harm apart from being called a few names :D
Should have been introduced years ago! I also think they should have age and vehicle categories like on a motorbike. You can't just jump on to a large motorbike now, as you have to start on a 50cc at 16 and work your way up. I think all new young drivers should start of in a 1ltr car. It didn't do me any harm apart from being called a few names :D BlueRay79
  • Score: 9

12:16pm Wed 28 May 14

Jim271 says...

A person can drive when he is 17 but is not considered in law to be an adult until he is 18.

Increase the age to 18,
A person can drive when he is 17 but is not considered in law to be an adult until he is 18. Increase the age to 18, Jim271
  • Score: 6

4:20pm Wed 28 May 14

davethomasadi says...

The telematics (black box insurance) system is already working, no need to put silly restrictions like no passengers, no night driving for new drivers, which cannot be enforced properly.
It's only a minority of young drivers who turn into idiots when they pass their test, and the only way to deal with these is to revamp and strengthen the New Driver regulations.

Blue Ray79, a 1ltr car can still go round bends and hit trees at 50mph.
The telematics (black box insurance) system is already working, no need to put silly restrictions like no passengers, no night driving for new drivers, which cannot be enforced properly. It's only a minority of young drivers who turn into idiots when they pass their test, and the only way to deal with these is to revamp and strengthen the New Driver regulations. Blue Ray79, a 1ltr car can still go round bends and hit trees at 50mph. davethomasadi
  • Score: -2

4:37pm Wed 28 May 14

BlueRay79 says...

davethomasadi wrote:
The telematics (black box insurance) system is already working, no need to put silly restrictions like no passengers, no night driving for new drivers, which cannot be enforced properly.
It's only a minority of young drivers who turn into idiots when they pass their test, and the only way to deal with these is to revamp and strengthen the New Driver regulations.

Blue Ray79, a 1ltr car can still go round bends and hit trees at 50mph.
Why would they need anything above 1ltr though? They should be on probation for 2 years. Letting a young person have access to 2 and 3ltr cars even if only on hire is totally wrong.

If your saying they should be able to drive what size car they want, then why not let motorcyclists ride what size bike they want at 16?

You have to be 21 now to go in for full unrestricted bike licence and that's a good thing.

Telematics may be bringing insurance down for youngsters but how long before people start opening shops and selling devices to get round them? Any technology can be hacked. If it can be programmed, it can be hacked.
[quote][p][bold]davethomasadi[/bold] wrote: The telematics (black box insurance) system is already working, no need to put silly restrictions like no passengers, no night driving for new drivers, which cannot be enforced properly. It's only a minority of young drivers who turn into idiots when they pass their test, and the only way to deal with these is to revamp and strengthen the New Driver regulations. Blue Ray79, a 1ltr car can still go round bends and hit trees at 50mph.[/p][/quote]Why would they need anything above 1ltr though? They should be on probation for 2 years. Letting a young person have access to 2 and 3ltr cars even if only on hire is totally wrong. If your saying they should be able to drive what size car they want, then why not let motorcyclists ride what size bike they want at 16? You have to be 21 now to go in for full unrestricted bike licence and that's a good thing. Telematics may be bringing insurance down for youngsters but how long before people start opening shops and selling devices to get round them? Any technology can be hacked. If it can be programmed, it can be hacked. BlueRay79
  • Score: 0

4:54pm Wed 28 May 14

davethomasadi says...

Your comment re the telematics suggests that you don't understand how it works. Those who buy telematics insurance do so because they want cheaper insurance. Their incentive to drive safely and have their driving monitored 24/7 is reduced premiums more quickly than having to build up several years no claims bonus.

Learning to drive in a big engine car has many advantages. At least when they pass they are capable of handling a more powerful car than the little noddy cars some people learn in.

Under the New Driver regulations they are on probation for the first two years of holding a full licence.
Your comment re the telematics suggests that you don't understand how it works. Those who buy telematics insurance do so because they want cheaper insurance. Their incentive to drive safely and have their driving monitored 24/7 is reduced premiums more quickly than having to build up several years no claims bonus. Learning to drive in a big engine car has many advantages. At least when they pass they are capable of handling a more powerful car than the little noddy cars some people learn in. Under the New Driver regulations they are on probation for the first two years of holding a full licence. davethomasadi
  • Score: 2

5:03pm Wed 28 May 14

Lomax2321 says...

so im a 18 year old doorman and i work till 4AM and start at 9, i drive 3 guys in to work every evening ? what am i supposed then ?
so im a 18 year old doorman and i work till 4AM and start at 9, i drive 3 guys in to work every evening ? what am i supposed then ? Lomax2321
  • Score: 5

5:14pm Wed 28 May 14

davethomasadi says...

Lomax2321 wrote:
so im a 18 year old doorman and i work till 4AM and start at 9, i drive 3 guys in to work every evening ? what am i supposed then ?
The people who come up with these daft suggestions about not driving at night etc don't take the time to think how it would penalise certain groups of people, like Lomax. With telematics insurance you negotiate with the insurers on the time restrictions, so if you work overnight for example you would be covered to drive between work and home between certain times.
[quote][p][bold]Lomax2321[/bold] wrote: so im a 18 year old doorman and i work till 4AM and start at 9, i drive 3 guys in to work every evening ? what am i supposed then ?[/p][/quote]The people who come up with these daft suggestions about not driving at night etc don't take the time to think how it would penalise certain groups of people, like Lomax. With telematics insurance you negotiate with the insurers on the time restrictions, so if you work overnight for example you would be covered to drive between work and home between certain times. davethomasadi
  • Score: 5

5:22pm Wed 28 May 14

BlueRay79 says...

davethomasadi wrote:
Your comment re the telematics suggests that you don't understand how it works. Those who buy telematics insurance do so because they want cheaper insurance. Their incentive to drive safely and have their driving monitored 24/7 is reduced premiums more quickly than having to build up several years no claims bonus.

Learning to drive in a big engine car has many advantages. At least when they pass they are capable of handling a more powerful car than the little noddy cars some people learn in.

Under the New Driver regulations they are on probation for the first two years of holding a full licence.
Getting quotes on a Telematics box shows you would pay a higher premium if you do night time driving. So in effect you are having a penalty enforced on you.

I would not suggest any restrictions on night-time movement or passengers just the engine size and more severe penalties if you cause an accident.

I don't agree with your comment on learning in a more powerful car. It's always best to start in a small car and gain experience. The same with a motorbike. My instructor told me to do 12 months on a 125 or risk killing myself and he was right. Had I jumped straight on 600cc, I would most likely have injured myself or worse.

You gain road experience over time. I worked up from a 1ltr to 2ltr and have luckily never had an accident or claim in over 10 years.
[quote][p][bold]davethomasadi[/bold] wrote: Your comment re the telematics suggests that you don't understand how it works. Those who buy telematics insurance do so because they want cheaper insurance. Their incentive to drive safely and have their driving monitored 24/7 is reduced premiums more quickly than having to build up several years no claims bonus. Learning to drive in a big engine car has many advantages. At least when they pass they are capable of handling a more powerful car than the little noddy cars some people learn in. Under the New Driver regulations they are on probation for the first two years of holding a full licence.[/p][/quote]Getting quotes on a Telematics box shows you would pay a higher premium if you do night time driving. So in effect you are having a penalty enforced on you. I would not suggest any restrictions on night-time movement or passengers just the engine size and more severe penalties if you cause an accident. I don't agree with your comment on learning in a more powerful car. It's always best to start in a small car and gain experience. The same with a motorbike. My instructor told me to do 12 months on a 125 or risk killing myself and he was right. Had I jumped straight on 600cc, I would most likely have injured myself or worse. You gain road experience over time. I worked up from a 1ltr to 2ltr and have luckily never had an accident or claim in over 10 years. BlueRay79
  • Score: 2

5:45pm Wed 28 May 14

davethomasadi says...

Motorcycling and driving a car cannot be compared because there is a vast weight to power ratio difference.
Your comment on starting to drive in a small car 'to gain experience' is illogical. You gain experience through practice. If you only learn to drive a small car you never gain any experience in handling a powerful car, whereas if you start learning in a powerful car by the time you pass you can handle both.
Whether it's a 1l or 2l engine, if you don't control it you could have serious consequences, but the more practice you can get at driving a powerful car, the more experience you will have when you pass the test and start on your own.
Motorcycling and driving a car cannot be compared because there is a vast weight to power ratio difference. Your comment on starting to drive in a small car 'to gain experience' is illogical. You gain experience through practice. If you only learn to drive a small car you never gain any experience in handling a powerful car, whereas if you start learning in a powerful car by the time you pass you can handle both. Whether it's a 1l or 2l engine, if you don't control it you could have serious consequences, but the more practice you can get at driving a powerful car, the more experience you will have when you pass the test and start on your own. davethomasadi
  • Score: -1

6:44pm Wed 28 May 14

BIG ERN says...

Thank you BN, for including a photo of an overturned car after a crash. Had you not told me what it was, I would surely have been perplexed for many hours.
Thank you BN, for including a photo of an overturned car after a crash. Had you not told me what it was, I would surely have been perplexed for many hours. BIG ERN
  • Score: 5

7:17pm Wed 28 May 14

BlueRay79 says...

davethomasadi wrote:
Motorcycling and driving a car cannot be compared because there is a vast weight to power ratio difference.
Your comment on starting to drive in a small car 'to gain experience' is illogical. You gain experience through practice. If you only learn to drive a small car you never gain any experience in handling a powerful car, whereas if you start learning in a powerful car by the time you pass you can handle both.
Whether it's a 1l or 2l engine, if you don't control it you could have serious consequences, but the more practice you can get at driving a powerful car, the more experience you will have when you pass the test and start on your own.
Ok then, where are all the 3ltr cars used in driving tuition? If your point was valid, surely it would be widely used?

Your points might be logical to you.
[quote][p][bold]davethomasadi[/bold] wrote: Motorcycling and driving a car cannot be compared because there is a vast weight to power ratio difference. Your comment on starting to drive in a small car 'to gain experience' is illogical. You gain experience through practice. If you only learn to drive a small car you never gain any experience in handling a powerful car, whereas if you start learning in a powerful car by the time you pass you can handle both. Whether it's a 1l or 2l engine, if you don't control it you could have serious consequences, but the more practice you can get at driving a powerful car, the more experience you will have when you pass the test and start on your own.[/p][/quote]Ok then, where are all the 3ltr cars used in driving tuition? If your point was valid, surely it would be widely used? Your points might be logical to you. BlueRay79
  • Score: 3

2:08pm Thu 29 May 14

swilson143 says...

As a person who is 18 with a provisional licence I think this is wrong I got mine for ID and to be able to learn when I have the money which isn't going to be soon. I work for an agency and some shifts don't finish til 4 am. Also the career I want persue is one where I won't be leaving til very late on in the evening to early in the morning. Its going to put more people off driving than it already is at the moment because the price of learning and cuting the hours of driving will shorten meaning when I've learnt and past my test then I'd have to pay between £30 & £80 for a taxi to get me home after a shift depending on where I am. If anything new drivers should have the black box installed into any car they purchase and use and if they are dangerous on the roads then they should be put on either a 6 month course or a supension for a few months from driving in public and be put on a course because it isn't ALL YOUNG DRIVERS some people who cause trouble or aren't safe drivers are older people in their 40's.
As a person who is 18 with a provisional licence I think this is wrong I got mine for ID and to be able to learn when I have the money which isn't going to be soon. I work for an agency and some shifts don't finish til 4 am. Also the career I want persue is one where I won't be leaving til very late on in the evening to early in the morning. Its going to put more people off driving than it already is at the moment because the price of learning and cuting the hours of driving will shorten meaning when I've learnt and past my test then I'd have to pay between £30 & £80 for a taxi to get me home after a shift depending on where I am. If anything new drivers should have the black box installed into any car they purchase and use and if they are dangerous on the roads then they should be put on either a 6 month course or a supension for a few months from driving in public and be put on a course because it isn't ALL YOUNG DRIVERS some people who cause trouble or aren't safe drivers are older people in their 40's. swilson143
  • Score: 1

2:11pm Thu 29 May 14

Jim271 says...

There are people driving around with no tax insurance MOT and being banned.

Who is going to enforce this?
There are people driving around with no tax insurance MOT and being banned. Who is going to enforce this? Jim271
  • Score: 0

5:34pm Thu 29 May 14

Is it me... says...

The statistics tell the story.. it is the young drivers who have the most collisions.. and therefre have the huge insurance premiums.. The crazy fact is that people are taught to pass a test, not to drive.. They have not been instucted how to use a motorway, probably never driven at night.. or in adverse weather conditions... The Bolton IAM offer an excellent course on how to learn advanced driving which covers all these aspects, plus they are all volunteers... an excellent organisation and one of the best courses I have ever taken... If you are a parent then you should enroll your new driver son or daughter on this course..
The statistics tell the story.. it is the young drivers who have the most collisions.. and therefre have the huge insurance premiums.. The crazy fact is that people are taught to pass a test, not to drive.. They have not been instucted how to use a motorway, probably never driven at night.. or in adverse weather conditions... The Bolton IAM offer an excellent course on how to learn advanced driving which covers all these aspects, plus they are all volunteers... an excellent organisation and one of the best courses I have ever taken... If you are a parent then you should enroll your new driver son or daughter on this course.. Is it me...
  • Score: -1

5:59pm Thu 29 May 14

davethomasadi says...

Is it me... wrote:
The statistics tell the story.. it is the young drivers who have the most collisions.. and therefre have the huge insurance premiums.. The crazy fact is that people are taught to pass a test, not to drive.. They have not been instucted how to use a motorway, probably never driven at night.. or in adverse weather conditions... The Bolton IAM offer an excellent course on how to learn advanced driving which covers all these aspects, plus they are all volunteers... an excellent organisation and one of the best courses I have ever taken... If you are a parent then you should enroll your new driver son or daughter on this course..
..................sa
ys a weekend hobbyist 'expert'. Anyone passing a test has demonstrated that they CAN dirve safely. If they continue to drive how they were coached, using the knowledge they gained, with experience they become good safe drivers. Problem is once they get on their own they start to follow their peers and pick up the bad attitude and driving habits.
Many young drivers continue to drive to a good standard, but are labelled because of the minority of those who decide they want to drive like idiots.
Telematics insurance is now becoming very popular with young drivers, and with an increasing number of insurers who have seen over the last two years how effective it is.

Blueray79, driving schools don't use 3l cars for one simple reason, and that is cost.
[quote][p][bold]Is it me...[/bold] wrote: The statistics tell the story.. it is the young drivers who have the most collisions.. and therefre have the huge insurance premiums.. The crazy fact is that people are taught to pass a test, not to drive.. They have not been instucted how to use a motorway, probably never driven at night.. or in adverse weather conditions... The Bolton IAM offer an excellent course on how to learn advanced driving which covers all these aspects, plus they are all volunteers... an excellent organisation and one of the best courses I have ever taken... If you are a parent then you should enroll your new driver son or daughter on this course..[/p][/quote]..................sa ys a weekend hobbyist 'expert'. Anyone passing a test has demonstrated that they CAN dirve safely. If they continue to drive how they were coached, using the knowledge they gained, with experience they become good safe drivers. Problem is once they get on their own they start to follow their peers and pick up the bad attitude and driving habits. Many young drivers continue to drive to a good standard, but are labelled because of the minority of those who decide they want to drive like idiots. Telematics insurance is now becoming very popular with young drivers, and with an increasing number of insurers who have seen over the last two years how effective it is. Blueray79, driving schools don't use 3l cars for one simple reason, and that is cost. davethomasadi
  • Score: 0

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