Blackburn Catholic school switching faiths to survive

Falling numbers of Catholic pupils meant Sacred  Heart school was ‘no longer fulfilling its responsibility’ as an RC school

Falling numbers of Catholic pupils meant Sacred Heart school was ‘no longer fulfilling its responsibility’ as an RC school

First published in News
Last updated
This Is Lancashire: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

A CATHOLIC primary is set to become the first school to switch denominations in order to stay open.

Sacred Heart RC Primary School, in Lynwood Road, Blackburn, will now come under the direction of the Cidari Trust, which is run by the Diocese of Black-burn, from September.

Talks between the Dioceses of Blackburn and Salf-ord are believed to have lasted almost six months.

Parents of pupils at the school have received a letter from the governors inf-orming them of the news.

A spokesman for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Salford said it was thought it was the first time such a change in status, from one denomination to the other, had taken place.

He said the decision had been taken because falling numbers of Catholic pupils on the roll meant the school, which currently has 189 pupils, was ‘no longer fulfilling its responsibility’ to its ‘Trust Deed’ as a Roman Catholic school.

Nick Kennedy, chairman of governors, said: “This dec- ision secures the future of the school which is wonderful. The school has been struggling for its future for five, or six, years now.

“Various routes have been explored and come to nothing, so this is a very pos-itive outcome for the community.

“Everybody’s contract of employment is protected and this is a successful and popular school.”

Following the ratification from the government, the school’s governors unanimously passed a resolution yesterday requesting an ‘Academy Order’ from the Secretary of State, which will allow the school to become an academy.

Canon Anthony McBride, from the Diocese of Salford, said: “Salford Diocese, anxious for the welfare of the pupils, staff and whole school community, and recognising the huge degree of confidence that the parents have for the school, is delighted that the Cidari Trust will be the sponsoring body to now take the school forward.

“Getting to this point has been a complicated process. “There was no ‘blueprint’, but great willingness from Blackburn Diocese and its Cidari Trust; the Salford Diocesan Trustees and the school’s own governing body has ensured a successful conclusion to the ongoing discussions and the child-ren will now continue to have the highest quality of education, and care,” he added There are currently three schools that are also set to join the Cidari Trust.

And an ‘unspecified’ number of others are pursuing the status.

The only school that the trust currently runs is St George’s High School, in Blackpool.

Comments (17)

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10:21am Thu 3 Apr 14

shirtbox says...

The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country!
The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country! shirtbox
  • Score: 3

10:39am Thu 3 Apr 14

Excluded again says...

shirtbox wrote:
The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country!
Err, did you actually read the story?

The school is being transferred from the RC church to the CofE.

If you could just switch off the racist paranoia goggles for a moment, there is something much more interesting going on here. Because you are absolutely right that the falling numbers of catholic children attending the school is because the area has become predominantly Asian and therefore predominantly Muslim.

So why has the CofE been so keen to take the school on? The story suggests that this has been quite a struggle. So why have the Catholic Church and the Church of England spent so much time and effort switching a school of largely Muslim pupils between them?

Maybe the sort of question a journalist might ask?
[quote][p][bold]shirtbox[/bold] wrote: The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country![/p][/quote]Err, did you actually read the story? The school is being transferred from the RC church to the CofE. If you could just switch off the racist paranoia goggles for a moment, there is something much more interesting going on here. Because you are absolutely right that the falling numbers of catholic children attending the school is because the area has become predominantly Asian and therefore predominantly Muslim. So why has the CofE been so keen to take the school on? The story suggests that this has been quite a struggle. So why have the Catholic Church and the Church of England spent so much time and effort switching a school of largely Muslim pupils between them? Maybe the sort of question a journalist might ask? Excluded again
  • Score: 39

10:49am Thu 3 Apr 14

Reality50 says...

At least it isn't becoming islamic which is at least something.
At least it isn't becoming islamic which is at least something. Reality50
  • Score: 7

10:51am Thu 3 Apr 14

ConcernedOssy says...

Excluded again wrote:
shirtbox wrote:
The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country!
Err, did you actually read the story?

The school is being transferred from the RC church to the CofE.

If you could just switch off the racist paranoia goggles for a moment, there is something much more interesting going on here. Because you are absolutely right that the falling numbers of catholic children attending the school is because the area has become predominantly Asian and therefore predominantly Muslim.

So why has the CofE been so keen to take the school on? The story suggests that this has been quite a struggle. So why have the Catholic Church and the Church of England spent so much time and effort switching a school of largely Muslim pupils between them?

Maybe the sort of question a journalist might ask?
The loonies have certainly took over the asylum !!
[quote][p][bold]Excluded again[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]shirtbox[/bold] wrote: The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country![/p][/quote]Err, did you actually read the story? The school is being transferred from the RC church to the CofE. If you could just switch off the racist paranoia goggles for a moment, there is something much more interesting going on here. Because you are absolutely right that the falling numbers of catholic children attending the school is because the area has become predominantly Asian and therefore predominantly Muslim. So why has the CofE been so keen to take the school on? The story suggests that this has been quite a struggle. So why have the Catholic Church and the Church of England spent so much time and effort switching a school of largely Muslim pupils between them? Maybe the sort of question a journalist might ask?[/p][/quote]The loonies have certainly took over the asylum !! ConcernedOssy
  • Score: -6

10:56am Thu 3 Apr 14

ladysal says...

ConcernedOssy wrote:
Excluded again wrote:
shirtbox wrote:
The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country!
Err, did you actually read the story?

The school is being transferred from the RC church to the CofE.

If you could just switch off the racist paranoia goggles for a moment, there is something much more interesting going on here. Because you are absolutely right that the falling numbers of catholic children attending the school is because the area has become predominantly Asian and therefore predominantly Muslim.

So why has the CofE been so keen to take the school on? The story suggests that this has been quite a struggle. So why have the Catholic Church and the Church of England spent so much time and effort switching a school of largely Muslim pupils between them?

Maybe the sort of question a journalist might ask?
The loonies have certainly took over the asylum !!
Because Catholic Diocesean policy is anti academy..... Guess what Sacred Heart will be in September!!!!
[quote][p][bold]ConcernedOssy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Excluded again[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]shirtbox[/bold] wrote: The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country![/p][/quote]Err, did you actually read the story? The school is being transferred from the RC church to the CofE. If you could just switch off the racist paranoia goggles for a moment, there is something much more interesting going on here. Because you are absolutely right that the falling numbers of catholic children attending the school is because the area has become predominantly Asian and therefore predominantly Muslim. So why has the CofE been so keen to take the school on? The story suggests that this has been quite a struggle. So why have the Catholic Church and the Church of England spent so much time and effort switching a school of largely Muslim pupils between them? Maybe the sort of question a journalist might ask?[/p][/quote]The loonies have certainly took over the asylum !![/p][/quote]Because Catholic Diocesean policy is anti academy..... Guess what Sacred Heart will be in September!!!! ladysal
  • Score: 10

11:48am Thu 3 Apr 14

Cimbri says...

Is this a religious sort of thing, like (John 14:2) 'there are many mansions to my Fathers house', move?
OR
A cunning plan to improve the under-16's side, for the inter-faith football competition, with the addition of more left footers?
Is this a religious sort of thing, like (John 14:2) 'there are many mansions to my Fathers house', move? OR A cunning plan to improve the under-16's side, for the inter-faith football competition, with the addition of more left footers? Cimbri
  • Score: -3

11:48am Thu 3 Apr 14

b'burn_citizen_73 says...

this was my primary school in the early 80's and a as one of a handful of Muslim pupils attending at the time it was special educational establishment. The RC school allowed and respected my background but also taught me the values of Catholicism and religions function in a society. It was first to demonstrate to me all communities and faiths can live together and prosper.

I shall forever be grateful to the Headteacher and staff of the time, they certainly are the fondest memories of my schooling years.
this was my primary school in the early 80's and a as one of a handful of Muslim pupils attending at the time it was special educational establishment. The RC school allowed and respected my background but also taught me the values of Catholicism and religions function in a society. It was first to demonstrate to me all communities and faiths can live together and prosper. I shall forever be grateful to the Headteacher and staff of the time, they certainly are the fondest memories of my schooling years. b'burn_citizen_73
  • Score: 42

12:37pm Thu 3 Apr 14

mmickk says...

A refreshing change would have been to have a no faith school. With religious education based on the history of all religions. When are all these do gooders going to realize faith belongs at home and should stay there let the children grow up and decide for themselves. You bang on about integration well start by stop tarring kids by faith they have enough pressure growing up without having religion thrown at them.
A refreshing change would have been to have a no faith school. With religious education based on the history of all religions. When are all these do gooders going to realize faith belongs at home and should stay there let the children grow up and decide for themselves. You bang on about integration well start by stop tarring kids by faith they have enough pressure growing up without having religion thrown at them. mmickk
  • Score: 33

12:52pm Thu 3 Apr 14

ladysal says...

mmickk wrote:
A refreshing change would have been to have a no faith school. With religious education based on the history of all religions. When are all these do gooders going to realize faith belongs at home and should stay there let the children grow up and decide for themselves. You bang on about integration well start by stop tarring kids by faith they have enough pressure growing up without having religion thrown at them.
Spoken by someone who obviously has no idea of religious education within a Catholic School. My daughter attends such a school and has a far greater knowledge and understanding of all religions, not just her own. They learn about and mark all the religious festivals of all the major religions. She can appreciate Ramadan becuase she has a religious marker to compare it with - Lent. She knows how the religions link - Isaac and Ishmael, Noah, Abraham - all of whom have relevance for Jews and Muslims, the Muslim view of Jesus as a great prophet who is worthy of a grave site next to Mohammed. Religion teaches her and all other children brought up in this way about responsibility, trust, expected behaviour. It gives them a code to live by which can easily be separated from the religious dogma if they so wish. In my daughter's csae, she will be given the choice as to whether she continues following religion when she is capable of making that decision. In the meantime, she has structure and an explanation for many of the questions that haunt us all: such as why did the earth come into being....
[quote][p][bold]mmickk[/bold] wrote: A refreshing change would have been to have a no faith school. With religious education based on the history of all religions. When are all these do gooders going to realize faith belongs at home and should stay there let the children grow up and decide for themselves. You bang on about integration well start by stop tarring kids by faith they have enough pressure growing up without having religion thrown at them.[/p][/quote]Spoken by someone who obviously has no idea of religious education within a Catholic School. My daughter attends such a school and has a far greater knowledge and understanding of all religions, not just her own. They learn about and mark all the religious festivals of all the major religions. She can appreciate Ramadan becuase she has a religious marker to compare it with - Lent. She knows how the religions link - Isaac and Ishmael, Noah, Abraham - all of whom have relevance for Jews and Muslims, the Muslim view of Jesus as a great prophet who is worthy of a grave site next to Mohammed. Religion teaches her and all other children brought up in this way about responsibility, trust, expected behaviour. It gives them a code to live by which can easily be separated from the religious dogma if they so wish. In my daughter's csae, she will be given the choice as to whether she continues following religion when she is capable of making that decision. In the meantime, she has structure and an explanation for many of the questions that haunt us all: such as why did the earth come into being.... ladysal
  • Score: 8

1:28pm Thu 3 Apr 14

Excluded again says...

But we know why the earth formed and have done for years. As a massive cloud of space debris began to form large objects under the force of gravity, the largest became our sun. The smaller ones mostly collided together and formed the planets - but were occasionally captured as moons or if they were in a stable orbit in the asteroid belt stayed as they were.

This is easy to explain to a six year old. And, if you have a decent pair of binoculars and a clear night you can show her the evidence by looking at the craters caused by collision impacts on the moon. Structure, explanation and evidence - perfect.
But we know why the earth formed and have done for years. As a massive cloud of space debris began to form large objects under the force of gravity, the largest became our sun. The smaller ones mostly collided together and formed the planets - but were occasionally captured as moons or if they were in a stable orbit in the asteroid belt stayed as they were. This is easy to explain to a six year old. And, if you have a decent pair of binoculars and a clear night you can show her the evidence by looking at the craters caused by collision impacts on the moon. Structure, explanation and evidence - perfect. Excluded again
  • Score: 15

5:37pm Thu 3 Apr 14

Cimbri says...

ladysal wrote:
mmickk wrote:
A refreshing change would have been to have a no faith school. With religious education based on the history of all religions. When are all these do gooders going to realize faith belongs at home and should stay there let the children grow up and decide for themselves. You bang on about integration well start by stop tarring kids by faith they have enough pressure growing up without having religion thrown at them.
Spoken by someone who obviously has no idea of religious education within a Catholic School. My daughter attends such a school and has a far greater knowledge and understanding of all religions, not just her own. They learn about and mark all the religious festivals of all the major religions. She can appreciate Ramadan becuase she has a religious marker to compare it with - Lent. She knows how the religions link - Isaac and Ishmael, Noah, Abraham - all of whom have relevance for Jews and Muslims, the Muslim view of Jesus as a great prophet who is worthy of a grave site next to Mohammed. Religion teaches her and all other children brought up in this way about responsibility, trust, expected behaviour. It gives them a code to live by which can easily be separated from the religious dogma if they so wish. In my daughter's csae, she will be given the choice as to whether she continues following religion when she is capable of making that decision. In the meantime, she has structure and an explanation for many of the questions that haunt us all: such as why did the earth come into being....
I was raised in an bigoted household, where my grandmother would spit, if nuns or priests passed by. I was sent to a church school, where I was taught the Papist dogma was something to be reviled, as it followed the Pauline line of teachings, that were nothing to do with the gospels.
My parents went nuts, when the found out that I had attended a Catholic Mass, with my childhood sweetheart and banned me from seeing her, ever again. 50 years later and I still hold a candle for her, my first love.
My idealism was challenged by serving in Northern Ireland, where I saw what bigotry could do to a country, rending it apart and filling hearts with hatred and division.
My wife was Catholic but I never changed to her faith and just let her get on with it. The only time that I ever had a problem with faith, was when we were being approached by her priest, that I should sign an undertaking, that our children would be raised as Catholics. Not that it bothered me but I did notice that children that went to Catholic faith schools, performed better, educationally. So, wanting the best for our sprouts, they went there.
Whilst I have a fair degree of intellect, that our kids have inherited, it has to be said that, those Catholic schools brought out the very best in them, with both going on to have really good careers in medicine. Am still a bigot but at least I've done the best that a man can do to make a difference in our children.
I still don't like Catholicism but would have no qualms, in recommending their schools, to all and sundry. What that says about me, is for you to judge, I suppose.
[quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mmickk[/bold] wrote: A refreshing change would have been to have a no faith school. With religious education based on the history of all religions. When are all these do gooders going to realize faith belongs at home and should stay there let the children grow up and decide for themselves. You bang on about integration well start by stop tarring kids by faith they have enough pressure growing up without having religion thrown at them.[/p][/quote]Spoken by someone who obviously has no idea of religious education within a Catholic School. My daughter attends such a school and has a far greater knowledge and understanding of all religions, not just her own. They learn about and mark all the religious festivals of all the major religions. She can appreciate Ramadan becuase she has a religious marker to compare it with - Lent. She knows how the religions link - Isaac and Ishmael, Noah, Abraham - all of whom have relevance for Jews and Muslims, the Muslim view of Jesus as a great prophet who is worthy of a grave site next to Mohammed. Religion teaches her and all other children brought up in this way about responsibility, trust, expected behaviour. It gives them a code to live by which can easily be separated from the religious dogma if they so wish. In my daughter's csae, she will be given the choice as to whether she continues following religion when she is capable of making that decision. In the meantime, she has structure and an explanation for many of the questions that haunt us all: such as why did the earth come into being....[/p][/quote]I was raised in an bigoted household, where my grandmother would spit, if nuns or priests passed by. I was sent to a church school, where I was taught the Papist dogma was something to be reviled, as it followed the Pauline line of teachings, that were nothing to do with the gospels. My parents went nuts, when the found out that I had attended a Catholic Mass, with my childhood sweetheart and banned me from seeing her, ever again. 50 years later and I still hold a candle for her, my first love. My idealism was challenged by serving in Northern Ireland, where I saw what bigotry could do to a country, rending it apart and filling hearts with hatred and division. My wife was Catholic but I never changed to her faith and just let her get on with it. The only time that I ever had a problem with faith, was when we were being approached by her priest, that I should sign an undertaking, that our children would be raised as Catholics. Not that it bothered me but I did notice that children that went to Catholic faith schools, performed better, educationally. So, wanting the best for our sprouts, they went there. Whilst I have a fair degree of intellect, that our kids have inherited, it has to be said that, those Catholic schools brought out the very best in them, with both going on to have really good careers in medicine. Am still a bigot but at least I've done the best that a man can do to make a difference in our children. I still don't like Catholicism but would have no qualms, in recommending their schools, to all and sundry. What that says about me, is for you to judge, I suppose. Cimbri
  • Score: 13

7:40pm Thu 3 Apr 14

mmickk says...

ladysal wrote:
mmickk wrote:
A refreshing change would have been to have a no faith school. With religious education based on the history of all religions. When are all these do gooders going to realize faith belongs at home and should stay there let the children grow up and decide for themselves. You bang on about integration well start by stop tarring kids by faith they have enough pressure growing up without having religion thrown at them.
Spoken by someone who obviously has no idea of religious education within a Catholic School. My daughter attends such a school and has a far greater knowledge and understanding of all religions, not just her own. They learn about and mark all the religious festivals of all the major religions. She can appreciate Ramadan becuase she has a religious marker to compare it with - Lent. She knows how the religions link - Isaac and Ishmael, Noah, Abraham - all of whom have relevance for Jews and Muslims, the Muslim view of Jesus as a great prophet who is worthy of a grave site next to Mohammed. Religion teaches her and all other children brought up in this way about responsibility, trust, expected behaviour. It gives them a code to live by which can easily be separated from the religious dogma if they so wish. In my daughter's csae, she will be given the choice as to whether she continues following religion when she is capable of making that decision. In the meantime, she has structure and an explanation for many of the questions that haunt us all: such as why did the earth come into being....
How wrong you are im Catholic went to catholic school and still go to church my point being its my choice my business and nobody else. All religion does in schools is divide. Gone are the days of all children either being C of E or Catholic. I take it by your rant you are born again and trying to save the world!
[quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mmickk[/bold] wrote: A refreshing change would have been to have a no faith school. With religious education based on the history of all religions. When are all these do gooders going to realize faith belongs at home and should stay there let the children grow up and decide for themselves. You bang on about integration well start by stop tarring kids by faith they have enough pressure growing up without having religion thrown at them.[/p][/quote]Spoken by someone who obviously has no idea of religious education within a Catholic School. My daughter attends such a school and has a far greater knowledge and understanding of all religions, not just her own. They learn about and mark all the religious festivals of all the major religions. She can appreciate Ramadan becuase she has a religious marker to compare it with - Lent. She knows how the religions link - Isaac and Ishmael, Noah, Abraham - all of whom have relevance for Jews and Muslims, the Muslim view of Jesus as a great prophet who is worthy of a grave site next to Mohammed. Religion teaches her and all other children brought up in this way about responsibility, trust, expected behaviour. It gives them a code to live by which can easily be separated from the religious dogma if they so wish. In my daughter's csae, she will be given the choice as to whether she continues following religion when she is capable of making that decision. In the meantime, she has structure and an explanation for many of the questions that haunt us all: such as why did the earth come into being....[/p][/quote]How wrong you are im Catholic went to catholic school and still go to church my point being its my choice my business and nobody else. All religion does in schools is divide. Gone are the days of all children either being C of E or Catholic. I take it by your rant you are born again and trying to save the world! mmickk
  • Score: 3

8:43pm Thu 3 Apr 14

East_lancs_lad says...

Excluded again wrote:
shirtbox wrote:
The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country!
Err, did you actually read the story?

The school is being transferred from the RC church to the CofE.

If you could just switch off the racist paranoia goggles for a moment, there is something much more interesting going on here. Because you are absolutely right that the falling numbers of catholic children attending the school is because the area has become predominantly Asian and therefore predominantly Muslim.

So why has the CofE been so keen to take the school on? The story suggests that this has been quite a struggle. So why have the Catholic Church and the Church of England spent so much time and effort switching a school of largely Muslim pupils between them?

Maybe the sort of question a journalist might ask?
Because we are the Crusaders
[quote][p][bold]Excluded again[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]shirtbox[/bold] wrote: The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country![/p][/quote]Err, did you actually read the story? The school is being transferred from the RC church to the CofE. If you could just switch off the racist paranoia goggles for a moment, there is something much more interesting going on here. Because you are absolutely right that the falling numbers of catholic children attending the school is because the area has become predominantly Asian and therefore predominantly Muslim. So why has the CofE been so keen to take the school on? The story suggests that this has been quite a struggle. So why have the Catholic Church and the Church of England spent so much time and effort switching a school of largely Muslim pupils between them? Maybe the sort of question a journalist might ask?[/p][/quote]Because we are the Crusaders East_lancs_lad
  • Score: 5

11:50pm Thu 3 Apr 14

Graham Hartley says...

Excluded again wrote:
But we know why the earth formed and have done for years. As a massive cloud of space debris began to form large objects under the force of gravity, the largest became our sun. The smaller ones mostly collided together and formed the planets - but were occasionally captured as moons or if they were in a stable orbit in the asteroid belt stayed as they were.

This is easy to explain to a six year old. And, if you have a decent pair of binoculars and a clear night you can show her the evidence by looking at the craters caused by collision impacts on the moon. Structure, explanation and evidence - perfect.
Yes. Confusion will follow among some correspondents about 'why' and 'how' in this context - any moving object does so because it has a 'natural' place which it must approach, by example... Aristotle is an easy target for blame here.
[quote][p][bold]Excluded again[/bold] wrote: But we know why the earth formed and have done for years. As a massive cloud of space debris began to form large objects under the force of gravity, the largest became our sun. The smaller ones mostly collided together and formed the planets - but were occasionally captured as moons or if they were in a stable orbit in the asteroid belt stayed as they were. This is easy to explain to a six year old. And, if you have a decent pair of binoculars and a clear night you can show her the evidence by looking at the craters caused by collision impacts on the moon. Structure, explanation and evidence - perfect.[/p][/quote]Yes. Confusion will follow among some correspondents about 'why' and 'how' in this context - any moving object does so because it has a 'natural' place which it must approach, by example... Aristotle is an easy target for blame here. Graham Hartley
  • Score: 1

10:02am Fri 4 Apr 14

ladysal says...

mmickk wrote:
ladysal wrote:
mmickk wrote:
A refreshing change would have been to have a no faith school. With religious education based on the history of all religions. When are all these do gooders going to realize faith belongs at home and should stay there let the children grow up and decide for themselves. You bang on about integration well start by stop tarring kids by faith they have enough pressure growing up without having religion thrown at them.
Spoken by someone who obviously has no idea of religious education within a Catholic School. My daughter attends such a school and has a far greater knowledge and understanding of all religions, not just her own. They learn about and mark all the religious festivals of all the major religions. She can appreciate Ramadan becuase she has a religious marker to compare it with - Lent. She knows how the religions link - Isaac and Ishmael, Noah, Abraham - all of whom have relevance for Jews and Muslims, the Muslim view of Jesus as a great prophet who is worthy of a grave site next to Mohammed. Religion teaches her and all other children brought up in this way about responsibility, trust, expected behaviour. It gives them a code to live by which can easily be separated from the religious dogma if they so wish. In my daughter's csae, she will be given the choice as to whether she continues following religion when she is capable of making that decision. In the meantime, she has structure and an explanation for many of the questions that haunt us all: such as why did the earth come into being....
How wrong you are im Catholic went to catholic school and still go to church my point being its my choice my business and nobody else. All religion does in schools is divide. Gone are the days of all children either being C of E or Catholic. I take it by your rant you are born again and trying to save the world!
Actually no, I'm a practising Catholic who can see the difference between my Catholic education and the one enjoyed by my daughter. You completely miss the point of my comment. I was simply trying to point out that the entire ethos of the religious education my daughter enjoys fits perfectly with what you ask for in the second line of your comment. Can I also point out that religious education is mandatory in all schools, regardless of whether or not they are faith schools? I also find your view point regarding personal faith and education interesting if you are, as you say, a practicing Catholic.
[quote][p][bold]mmickk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mmickk[/bold] wrote: A refreshing change would have been to have a no faith school. With religious education based on the history of all religions. When are all these do gooders going to realize faith belongs at home and should stay there let the children grow up and decide for themselves. You bang on about integration well start by stop tarring kids by faith they have enough pressure growing up without having religion thrown at them.[/p][/quote]Spoken by someone who obviously has no idea of religious education within a Catholic School. My daughter attends such a school and has a far greater knowledge and understanding of all religions, not just her own. They learn about and mark all the religious festivals of all the major religions. She can appreciate Ramadan becuase she has a religious marker to compare it with - Lent. She knows how the religions link - Isaac and Ishmael, Noah, Abraham - all of whom have relevance for Jews and Muslims, the Muslim view of Jesus as a great prophet who is worthy of a grave site next to Mohammed. Religion teaches her and all other children brought up in this way about responsibility, trust, expected behaviour. It gives them a code to live by which can easily be separated from the religious dogma if they so wish. In my daughter's csae, she will be given the choice as to whether she continues following religion when she is capable of making that decision. In the meantime, she has structure and an explanation for many of the questions that haunt us all: such as why did the earth come into being....[/p][/quote]How wrong you are im Catholic went to catholic school and still go to church my point being its my choice my business and nobody else. All religion does in schools is divide. Gone are the days of all children either being C of E or Catholic. I take it by your rant you are born again and trying to save the world![/p][/quote]Actually no, I'm a practising Catholic who can see the difference between my Catholic education and the one enjoyed by my daughter. You completely miss the point of my comment. I was simply trying to point out that the entire ethos of the religious education my daughter enjoys fits perfectly with what you ask for in the second line of your comment. Can I also point out that religious education is mandatory in all schools, regardless of whether or not they are faith schools? I also find your view point regarding personal faith and education interesting if you are, as you say, a practicing Catholic. ladysal
  • Score: -3

6:18pm Sat 5 Apr 14

pdb951 says...

Excluded again wrote:
shirtbox wrote:
The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country!
Err, did you actually read the story?

The school is being transferred from the RC church to the CofE.

If you could just switch off the racist paranoia goggles for a moment, there is something much more interesting going on here. Because you are absolutely right that the falling numbers of catholic children attending the school is because the area has become predominantly Asian and therefore predominantly Muslim.

So why has the CofE been so keen to take the school on? The story suggests that this has been quite a struggle. So why have the Catholic Church and the Church of England spent so much time and effort switching a school of largely Muslim pupils between them?

Maybe the sort of question a journalist might ask?
A C of E school generally panders to the mix of pupils there so if the majority are Asian that's the way it will go!
[quote][p][bold]Excluded again[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]shirtbox[/bold] wrote: The reason being the area is predominately Asian nowadays so I take it that the catholic pupils there now will be taught the Islamic faith.Sign of the future of this country![/p][/quote]Err, did you actually read the story? The school is being transferred from the RC church to the CofE. If you could just switch off the racist paranoia goggles for a moment, there is something much more interesting going on here. Because you are absolutely right that the falling numbers of catholic children attending the school is because the area has become predominantly Asian and therefore predominantly Muslim. So why has the CofE been so keen to take the school on? The story suggests that this has been quite a struggle. So why have the Catholic Church and the Church of England spent so much time and effort switching a school of largely Muslim pupils between them? Maybe the sort of question a journalist might ask?[/p][/quote]A C of E school generally panders to the mix of pupils there so if the majority are Asian that's the way it will go! pdb951
  • Score: 1

10:40pm Sun 6 Apr 14

Graham Hartley says...

"...an explanation for many of the questions that haunt us all: such as why did the earth come into being...."

Is such interesting cosmology taught in primary school? That there must be a gravity-like law and so negative gravitational energy, and that on the scale of a universe there is sufficient positive energy (from mass and other considerations - pace Einstein) to permit the spontaneous creation of universes in which the total energy is zero. That's it, in the fewest words I can use; and 'God' is not among them.
"...an explanation for many of the questions that haunt us all: such as why did the earth come into being...." Is such interesting cosmology taught in primary school? That there must be a gravity-like law and so negative gravitational energy, and that on the scale of a universe there is sufficient positive energy (from mass and other considerations - pace Einstein) to permit the spontaneous creation of universes in which the total energy is zero. That's it, in the fewest words I can use; and 'God' is not among them. Graham Hartley
  • Score: 0

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