Carbon monoxide fumes leave Blackburn family close to death

The house in Little Harwood where the leak happened

The house in Little Harwood where the leak happened

First published in News
Last updated
This Is Lancashire: Photograph of the Author by , Chief reporter

SIX members of the same family suffered carbon monoxide poisoning after a leak at their Blackburn home.

Neighbours said it was a ‘miracle’ the Patel family was rescued after a faulty water heater in the kitchen pumped the lethal gas through their house in Railway Grove, Little Harwood.

Brother and sister Yasin and Fatima managed to escape the worst of the fumes and have been praised for alerting the emergency services, just before 1pm on Saturday.

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But their parents Yusuf and Yasmin, and brothers Mohammed and Anas, had already collapsed and were unresponsive in the dining room of the terraced property.

One firefighter who was among the first to arrive said it was ‘like Armageddon’, with bodies sprawled around the back room.

Neighbour Asma Patel said: “In another couple of minutes they could have been dead. You could see they weren’t well as they came out of the house.”

Her husband Salim added: “There were police cars and ambulances all along the road. It is just lucky that one of them managed to call 999.”

Watch manager Gary Ibbotson said a crew found an older boy and girl in a confused state on the pavement outside while the rest of the family members were semi-conscious.

Firefighters used ventilation fans to clear the property before officers went inside and gave the victims oxygen.

Mr Ibbotson said: “It was like Armageddon. There were bodies lying around everywhere. They were quite lucky because all six of them could have been in the dining room at the time.

“One of them had said earlier that they felt sick and the father said he couldn’t walk straight.

“One of the boys and his sister were in the living room and when they went back to the dining room everyone had collapsed around them.

“He put two and two together and thought that it must have been gas but he couldn’t smell anything because it was carbon monoxide.

“He probably saved their lives with what he did.

“The call was made initially to the ambulance service but we were alerted as well and we arrived on the scene at the same time as the first ambulance.”

An engineer was called out from the gas board to isolate the supply and the leak was eventually traced to the water heater which had broken and released fumes into the dining room.

All six were initially taken to Royal Blackburn Hospital, where it is said carbon monoxide poisoning was confirmed. The family members were discharged later and were believed to be stopping with family in Bolton yesterday.

Two more people who had been at the property prior to the incident also attended Royal Blackburn as a precaution when they felt unwell.

Mark and Hayley Kelly, who live the other side of the affected house, said they were relieved the family managed to get out in time.

Mr Kelly said: “They have been our neighbours for nearly 20 years. It was a miracle that they got out and we just hope they are all right now.”

According to neighbours, Yusuf works for Blackburn Council and his wife is a teaching assistant at St Stephen’s Primary School.

Carbon monoxide is both colourless and odourless and can cause those affected to initially suffer dizziness, nausea and led to collapse and even death.

Comments (18)

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11:26pm Sat 8 Mar 14

Sensei says...

The Gas Board??
It's been National Grid for over ten years, in 1991 they were British Gas therefor the gas board hasn't been used for at least 25 years!!!
The Gas Board?? It's been National Grid for over ten years, in 1991 they were British Gas therefor the gas board hasn't been used for at least 25 years!!! Sensei
  • Score: -13

12:20am Sun 9 Mar 14

Darwen Malc says...

Sensei wrote:
The Gas Board??
It's been National Grid for over ten years, in 1991 they were British Gas therefor the gas board hasn't been used for at least 25 years!!!
Pathetic to nit pick over this. It could quite easily be a story about fatalities, and thank God it wasn't. Whilst the LT constantly needs reminding of getting things factually correct, tagging such a comment to this story about a very minor glitch in detail verges on the ridiculous. Thankfully, no one has died.
[quote][p][bold]Sensei[/bold] wrote: The Gas Board?? It's been National Grid for over ten years, in 1991 they were British Gas therefor the gas board hasn't been used for at least 25 years!!![/p][/quote]Pathetic to nit pick over this. It could quite easily be a story about fatalities, and thank God it wasn't. Whilst the LT constantly needs reminding of getting things factually correct, tagging such a comment to this story about a very minor glitch in detail verges on the ridiculous. Thankfully, no one has died. Darwen Malc
  • Score: 48

9:02am Sun 9 Mar 14

woolywords says...

Darwen Malc wrote:
Sensei wrote:
The Gas Board??
It's been National Grid for over ten years, in 1991 they were British Gas therefor the gas board hasn't been used for at least 25 years!!!
Pathetic to nit pick over this. It could quite easily be a story about fatalities, and thank God it wasn't. Whilst the LT constantly needs reminding of getting things factually correct, tagging such a comment to this story about a very minor glitch in detail verges on the ridiculous. Thankfully, no one has died.
Whilst I echo your comments regarding the scale of the incident, where people could have died, you have to admit that that by saying, 'the gas board', does make it seem a little Pythonesque..
Monty Python, the gasman cometh..
Carbon Monoxide poisoning is evinced by people looking very pink.. especially in the finger tips.
All gas appliances should be regularly checked for CO emissions. Some landlords don't do this and are criminally liable for not caring about the importance of it.
Well done, young man, you cannot know how your prompt actions have saved lives here. Am forwarding this article to the Royal Humane Society, as I personally feel that your actions are deserving of being recognised.
You can be rightly proud of what you have done for your family and everyone should praise you for it.
[quote][p][bold]Darwen Malc[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sensei[/bold] wrote: The Gas Board?? It's been National Grid for over ten years, in 1991 they were British Gas therefor the gas board hasn't been used for at least 25 years!!![/p][/quote]Pathetic to nit pick over this. It could quite easily be a story about fatalities, and thank God it wasn't. Whilst the LT constantly needs reminding of getting things factually correct, tagging such a comment to this story about a very minor glitch in detail verges on the ridiculous. Thankfully, no one has died.[/p][/quote]Whilst I echo your comments regarding the scale of the incident, where people could have died, you have to admit that that by saying, 'the gas board', does make it seem a little Pythonesque.. Monty Python, the gasman cometh.. Carbon Monoxide poisoning is evinced by people looking very pink.. especially in the finger tips. All gas appliances should be regularly checked for CO emissions. Some landlords don't do this and are criminally liable for not caring about the importance of it. Well done, young man, you cannot know how your prompt actions have saved lives here. Am forwarding this article to the Royal Humane Society, as I personally feel that your actions are deserving of being recognised. You can be rightly proud of what you have done for your family and everyone should praise you for it. woolywords
  • Score: 19

9:07am Sun 9 Mar 14

happycyclist says...

Darwen Malc wrote:
Sensei wrote:
The Gas Board??
It's been National Grid for over ten years, in 1991 they were British Gas therefor the gas board hasn't been used for at least 25 years!!!
Pathetic to nit pick over this. It could quite easily be a story about fatalities, and thank God it wasn't. Whilst the LT constantly needs reminding of getting things factually correct, tagging such a comment to this story about a very minor glitch in detail verges on the ridiculous. Thankfully, no one has died.
If there had been fatalities, the LT would still have got the details wrong though, which would have been insensitive and added to the grief. It IS important that they get the details right -especially with serious stories like this.
[quote][p][bold]Darwen Malc[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sensei[/bold] wrote: The Gas Board?? It's been National Grid for over ten years, in 1991 they were British Gas therefor the gas board hasn't been used for at least 25 years!!![/p][/quote]Pathetic to nit pick over this. It could quite easily be a story about fatalities, and thank God it wasn't. Whilst the LT constantly needs reminding of getting things factually correct, tagging such a comment to this story about a very minor glitch in detail verges on the ridiculous. Thankfully, no one has died.[/p][/quote]If there had been fatalities, the LT would still have got the details wrong though, which would have been insensitive and added to the grief. It IS important that they get the details right -especially with serious stories like this. happycyclist
  • Score: 7

9:22am Sun 9 Mar 14

woolywords says...

What I wrote..
Would you kindly review this article from my local newspaper and give more than serious consideration for this young man being recognised for his inadvertent actions in saving the lives of his family.
http://www.lancashir
etelegraph.co.uk/new
s/blackburn/11063490
.Blackburn_family_in
_hospital_after_carb
on_monoxide_poisonin
g/
I lack the superlatives to express how deserving that he is of recognition, and it may go some way to raising awareness of the dangers of CO poisoning in everyday life.
You should earnestly consider him for being nationally recognised as being, a true life saver.


Feel free to email your own comments to them, if you so wish..
info@royalhumanesoci
ety.org.uk
What I wrote.. Would you kindly review this article from my local newspaper and give more than serious consideration for this young man being recognised for his inadvertent actions in saving the lives of his family. http://www.lancashir etelegraph.co.uk/new s/blackburn/11063490 .Blackburn_family_in _hospital_after_carb on_monoxide_poisonin g/ I lack the superlatives to express how deserving that he is of recognition, and it may go some way to raising awareness of the dangers of CO poisoning in everyday life. You should earnestly consider him for being nationally recognised as being, a true life saver. Feel free to email your own comments to them, if you so wish.. info@royalhumanesoci ety.org.uk woolywords
  • Score: 18

8:57pm Sun 9 Mar 14

happycyclist says...

Well said, Wooly.
Well said, Wooly. happycyclist
  • Score: 9

8:19am Mon 10 Mar 14

DaveBurnley says...

Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.
Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided. DaveBurnley
  • Score: 8

10:29am Mon 10 Mar 14

AnthonyUK says...

DaveBurnley wrote:
Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.
If gas/solidfuel/lpg/oi
l appliances are regularly serviced and used correctly in accordance with manufacturers recommendations and instructions then carbon monoxide poisoning shouldn't be an issue and there shouldn't be a need to install carbon monoxide alarms at all.
[quote][p][bold]DaveBurnley[/bold] wrote: Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.[/p][/quote]If gas/solidfuel/lpg/oi l appliances are regularly serviced and used correctly in accordance with manufacturers recommendations and instructions then carbon monoxide poisoning shouldn't be an issue and there shouldn't be a need to install carbon monoxide alarms at all. AnthonyUK
  • Score: 8

10:57am Mon 10 Mar 14

mmickk says...

These gas water heaters are lethal there seams to be a lot that fail maybe because its not a source of home heating people do not think to get them checked. I have one of these Kidde 7DCOC 10 Years Carbon Monoxide Alarm Digital can get them off amazon for £20 they are digital so they will show small amounts before the problem becomes lethal. £20 does not seam much when you read stories like this makes a great present. Hope the family make a full recovery.
These gas water heaters are lethal there seams to be a lot that fail maybe because its not a source of home heating people do not think to get them checked. I have one of these Kidde 7DCOC 10 Years Carbon Monoxide Alarm Digital can get them off amazon for £20 they are digital so they will show small amounts before the problem becomes lethal. £20 does not seam much when you read stories like this makes a great present. Hope the family make a full recovery. mmickk
  • Score: 4

12:17pm Mon 10 Mar 14

ladysal says...

DaveBurnley wrote:
Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.
May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge....
[quote][p][bold]DaveBurnley[/bold] wrote: Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.[/p][/quote]May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge.... ladysal
  • Score: 5

12:39pm Mon 10 Mar 14

AnthonyUK says...

ladysal wrote:
DaveBurnley wrote:
Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.
May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge....
I live in rented accommodation and don't have a smoke alarm and I don't have a carbonmonoxide alarm either am I wrong? I don't like smoke alarms because they go off falsely at the mere hint of cooking fumes and I don't have a waterheater so don't suffer the problems of carbonmonoxide poisoning.
[quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DaveBurnley[/bold] wrote: Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.[/p][/quote]May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge....[/p][/quote]I live in rented accommodation and don't have a smoke alarm and I don't have a carbonmonoxide alarm either am I wrong? I don't like smoke alarms because they go off falsely at the mere hint of cooking fumes and I don't have a waterheater so don't suffer the problems of carbonmonoxide poisoning. AnthonyUK
  • Score: -7

7:35pm Mon 10 Mar 14

DaveBurnley says...

ladysal wrote:
DaveBurnley wrote:
Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.
May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge....
The trouble is that a lot of landlords will only do the bare minimum, if even that. Fitting something that is not compulsory is something they wouldn't do because it costs a little bit of money.


The ones I bought aren't fitted, they are portable. So if I ever moved they could go with me to my new place, and carry on helping to protect me.
[quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DaveBurnley[/bold] wrote: Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.[/p][/quote]May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge....[/p][/quote]The trouble is that a lot of landlords will only do the bare minimum, if even that. Fitting something that is not compulsory is something they wouldn't do because it costs a little bit of money. The ones I bought aren't fitted, they are portable. So if I ever moved they could go with me to my new place, and carry on helping to protect me. DaveBurnley
  • Score: 3

7:42pm Mon 10 Mar 14

icannotrace says...

AnthonyUK wrote:
ladysal wrote:
DaveBurnley wrote:
Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.
May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge....
I live in rented accommodation and don't have a smoke alarm and I don't have a carbonmonoxide alarm either am I wrong? I don't like smoke alarms because they go off falsely at the mere hint of cooking fumes and I don't have a waterheater so don't suffer the problems of carbonmonoxide poisoning.
Lasysal suggested in rental properties "landlords" should be responsible for installing and maintaining fire alarms which is a "no brainer" and I don't understand why that isn't the law already.. As for a carbon monoxide alarms also yes if, of course, you have an appliance that has the potential to emit carbon monoxide fumes. If you don't have such a device and don't start your moped in the front room then I think you don't meet the requirement. As for smoke alarms going off when you're cooking either try not to burn anything or alternatively go an buy a decent one not one from Poundland. You never know for a small investment it may save your and someone else's life?
[quote][p][bold]AnthonyUK[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DaveBurnley[/bold] wrote: Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.[/p][/quote]May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge....[/p][/quote]I live in rented accommodation and don't have a smoke alarm and I don't have a carbonmonoxide alarm either am I wrong? I don't like smoke alarms because they go off falsely at the mere hint of cooking fumes and I don't have a waterheater so don't suffer the problems of carbonmonoxide poisoning.[/p][/quote]Lasysal suggested in rental properties "landlords" should be responsible for installing and maintaining fire alarms which is a "no brainer" and I don't understand why that isn't the law already.. As for a carbon monoxide alarms also yes if, of course, you have an appliance that has the potential to emit carbon monoxide fumes. If you don't have such a device and don't start your moped in the front room then I think you don't meet the requirement. As for smoke alarms going off when you're cooking either try not to burn anything or alternatively go an buy a decent one not one from Poundland. You never know for a small investment it may save your and someone else's life? icannotrace
  • Score: 2

8:34pm Mon 10 Mar 14

Saj143 says...

AnthonyUK wrote:
ladysal wrote:
DaveBurnley wrote:
Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.
May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge....
I live in rented accommodation and don't have a smoke alarm and I don't have a carbonmonoxide alarm either am I wrong? I don't like smoke alarms because they go off falsely at the mere hint of cooking fumes and I don't have a waterheater so don't suffer the problems of carbonmonoxide poisoning.
That's cos your beef dripping is too hot in your chip pan when your frying your chips !
[quote][p][bold]AnthonyUK[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DaveBurnley[/bold] wrote: Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.[/p][/quote]May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge....[/p][/quote]I live in rented accommodation and don't have a smoke alarm and I don't have a carbonmonoxide alarm either am I wrong? I don't like smoke alarms because they go off falsely at the mere hint of cooking fumes and I don't have a waterheater so don't suffer the problems of carbonmonoxide poisoning.[/p][/quote]That's cos your beef dripping is too hot in your chip pan when your frying your chips ! Saj143
  • Score: -4

9:02pm Mon 10 Mar 14

noddy57 says...

The silent killer,with the cost of living and the exorbitant service charges for checking gas appliances people shy away from regular inspections and the financial costs that they incur,,its maybe a good idea that when these units are first fitted they should come with a a carbon monoxide detector when you consider the inflated prices for central heating systems today l would say its the least that the installers can do,
The silent killer,with the cost of living and the exorbitant service charges for checking gas appliances people shy away from regular inspections and the financial costs that they incur,,its maybe a good idea that when these units are first fitted they should come with a a carbon monoxide detector when you consider the inflated prices for central heating systems today l would say its the least that the installers can do, noddy57
  • Score: 3

9:07pm Mon 10 Mar 14

M.DANNY says...

If Yusuf works for Blackburn Council and his wife was a teaching assistant they should know that any gas appliances in the house has to be serviced by registered gas engineer and he is qualified engineer that carries a safe gas card issued to all gas engineers.
British Gas has a contract service for gas appliances services and repairs and they give their customers free carbon monoxide alarms .Recently the local authorities were giving free carbon monoxide alarms and smoke alarms too.
Gas heaters Gas Central heating boilers, Gas Cookers and gas fires are very dangerous and should be serviced once a year.
Yusuf and his family were lucky and I wish them all the best for future but my message to Yusuf and rest of our fellow British subjects is to have all your gas appliances should safety checked and serviced once a year.
If Yusuf works for Blackburn Council and his wife was a teaching assistant they should know that any gas appliances in the house has to be serviced by registered gas engineer and he is qualified engineer that carries a safe gas card issued to all gas engineers. British Gas has a contract service for gas appliances services and repairs and they give their customers free carbon monoxide alarms .Recently the local authorities were giving free carbon monoxide alarms and smoke alarms too. Gas heaters Gas Central heating boilers, Gas Cookers and gas fires are very dangerous and should be serviced once a year. Yusuf and his family were lucky and I wish them all the best for future but my message to Yusuf and rest of our fellow British subjects is to have all your gas appliances should safety checked and serviced once a year. M.DANNY
  • Score: 4

9:30pm Mon 10 Mar 14

AnthonyUK says...

Saj143 wrote:
AnthonyUK wrote:
ladysal wrote:
DaveBurnley wrote:
Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.
May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge....
I live in rented accommodation and don't have a smoke alarm and I don't have a carbonmonoxide alarm either am I wrong? I don't like smoke alarms because they go off falsely at the mere hint of cooking fumes and I don't have a waterheater so don't suffer the problems of carbonmonoxide poisoning.
That's cos your beef dripping is too hot in your chip pan when your frying your chips !
I am NOT stupid! I dont do chip pan frying you silly man and I dont use a deep fat fryer either. I am always careful when cooking and always keep an eye on my food so it doesnt burn either And thats just good common sense. As for my gas cooker its a modern hotpoint one properly converted to calor gas with the correct lpg jet kit fed by a calor gas propane cylinder outdoors piped in thru professional installed pipework and I dont get carbon monoxide problems because it burns cleanly with a nice clear blue controllable flame without yellow tips or soot, also I use an extractor fan when cooking to expel cooking smells. Yellow tips and soot on calor gas appliances are a danger sign of carbon monoxide emission and should always be fixed by a calor gas servicing agent for your particular appliance-check out www.calor.co.uk for your nearest one.
[quote][p][bold]Saj143[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AnthonyUK[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DaveBurnley[/bold] wrote: Carbon monoxide detectors are now cheap enough for every home to be given one (cost around £15). If the government ensured that every home had one free of charge, then a lot of deaths might be avoided.[/p][/quote]May be so, but at £15, everyone should be able to buy them for themselves. As far as I am concerned, those who live in rented accommodation should have them fitted alongside the smoke alarm by the landlord. Everyone else should make the effort to but one themselves - as you say they are cheap enough now. Whats more important? 5 beers or a carbon monoxide alarm? You can't complain about the nanny state and then demand that the government provides you with an alarm free of charge....[/p][/quote]I live in rented accommodation and don't have a smoke alarm and I don't have a carbonmonoxide alarm either am I wrong? I don't like smoke alarms because they go off falsely at the mere hint of cooking fumes and I don't have a waterheater so don't suffer the problems of carbonmonoxide poisoning.[/p][/quote]That's cos your beef dripping is too hot in your chip pan when your frying your chips ![/p][/quote]I am NOT stupid! I dont do chip pan frying you silly man and I dont use a deep fat fryer either. I am always careful when cooking and always keep an eye on my food so it doesnt burn either And thats just good common sense. As for my gas cooker its a modern hotpoint one properly converted to calor gas with the correct lpg jet kit fed by a calor gas propane cylinder outdoors piped in thru professional installed pipework and I dont get carbon monoxide problems because it burns cleanly with a nice clear blue controllable flame without yellow tips or soot, also I use an extractor fan when cooking to expel cooking smells. Yellow tips and soot on calor gas appliances are a danger sign of carbon monoxide emission and should always be fixed by a calor gas servicing agent for your particular appliance-check out www.calor.co.uk for your nearest one. AnthonyUK
  • Score: 6

9:51pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Fatzzzzzz says...

Well done young man and your sister
Well done young man and your sister Fatzzzzzz
  • Score: 2

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