Project launched to honour Burnley's fallen WWI heroes

This Is Lancashire: Mike Townsend with schoolchildren at Burnley Town Hall where he spoke to them about adopting a soldier Mike Townsend with schoolchildren at Burnley Town Hall where he spoke to them about adopting a soldier

A PROJECT has been launched to honour the 4,213 Burnley people who died in the First World War.

Schoolchildren will lay crosses in memory of each of the borough’s fallen soldiers to coincide with the centenary of the start of the conflict. The scheme also includes ambitious plans to plant one million poppies by 2018.

Representatives of Burnley Pupils’ Parliament met with Towneley Hall curator Mike Townsend last week to kick-off Little Children Week.

The project, backed by the Heritage Lottery Fund, will see 3,900 crosses planted at Towneley Park, with the remainder spread throughout the borough’s memorial parks.

Council leader, Julie Cooper, said: “This year is the 100th year anniversary of the start of the First World War.

“During that war which lasted for four years, over 4,000 men from Burnley and Padiham were killed in action. It is important that we come together as a town to remember.

“Burnley Council has been working with our military covenant partners to organise a range of activities. These will include the planting of a million poppies, the placing of a named cross for each of those who gave their lives and exhibitions at Towneley Hall.

“Schoolchildren will be encouraged to ‘adopt’ a former soldier to learn more about the First World War and its impact on the soldiers and on the families back home.”

Individual crosses will bear the names of the 4,212 men and one woman from the borough who lost their lives in battle between 1914 and 1918.

Representatives of Burnley Pupils’ Parliament will have the honour of laying the first crosses in a special ceremony.

Comments (3)

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10:16pm Wed 19 Feb 14

Lancs_Lad says...

We should never forget the ultimate sacrifice that these men made.
We should never forget the ultimate sacrifice that these men made. Lancs_Lad
  • Score: 5

11:10pm Wed 19 Feb 14

noddy57 says...

no-matter how busy we may be any tribute to these long lost family and friends of ours who fought and died for our country in the great war has to be maintained through out history we should never ever forget their sacrifice,
no-matter how busy we may be any tribute to these long lost family and friends of ours who fought and died for our country in the great war has to be maintained through out history we should never ever forget their sacrifice, noddy57
  • Score: 5

9:06am Thu 20 Feb 14

Kevin, Colne says...

Sometimes when I’m walking along Albert Road in Colne I’ll stop by the cenotaph and I’ll stand there and quietly read the names to myself. I must look an odd sight.

I’m always struck by the length of the lists, and never fail to notice that some surnames appear more than once, which I suspect are brothers and cousins. It is always a sobering experience. Strangely when reading the names quietly you stop noticing the hub-hub of the world, and the triviality of much of our modern existence can be put into true perspective.

The best way to serve their sacrifice, I feel, is to contribute to building a better, kinder world. A smile to a stranger, a chat with a neighbour, small kindnesses when out shopping, praise for those for a job well done, better appreciation of the other fellows’ point of view, the offering of thoughtful comment, a meeting of minds, a recognition that we have more in common than divides us.

This, I think, is the way to move forward; a way that would makes those who died in war proud of what we had become.
Sometimes when I’m walking along Albert Road in Colne I’ll stop by the cenotaph and I’ll stand there and quietly read the names to myself. I must look an odd sight. I’m always struck by the length of the lists, and never fail to notice that some surnames appear more than once, which I suspect are brothers and cousins. It is always a sobering experience. Strangely when reading the names quietly you stop noticing the hub-hub of the world, and the triviality of much of our modern existence can be put into true perspective. The best way to serve their sacrifice, I feel, is to contribute to building a better, kinder world. A smile to a stranger, a chat with a neighbour, small kindnesses when out shopping, praise for those for a job well done, better appreciation of the other fellows’ point of view, the offering of thoughtful comment, a meeting of minds, a recognition that we have more in common than divides us. This, I think, is the way to move forward; a way that would makes those who died in war proud of what we had become. Kevin, Colne
  • Score: 5

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