QEGs in Blackburn to double intake of pupils

This Is Lancashire: QEGs in Blackburn to double intake of pupils QEGs in Blackburn to double intake of pupils

BLACKBURN’S Queen Elizabeth’s Grammar School is set to see pupil numbers more than double within a year.

At the start of term the school saw numbers boosted from 435 to 700. Now student numbers are expected to soar to 925 by September.

The increase comes as the school looks set to end its private status and will offer free education.

The West Park Road school has planned to expand numbers for some time but had initially planned to do it gradually with extra first year students.

However due to demand for places, the school has decided to take on additional pupils in Years 8 and 9 also, with some accepted in Year 10.

In a letter to parents, headteacher Simon Corns said: “Pupil recruitment is going very well. We’ve had 530 prospective Year 7 pupils sitting our Fair Banding Assessments though there are only 85 places available.

“Such has been the interest in our project, we have decided to bring our expansion forward. Though there will continue to be challenges as always when a school is expanding rapidly, we will achieve stability sooner than originally planned.”

Recruitment at sixth form level is also reported to be “healthy”.

The school is not expected to need any extra building space or physical expansion as the site has housed higher numbers in the past.

The Department for Education has not yet formally given the go-ahead for East Lancashire’s oldest grammar school to become a free school. If the process to become taxpayer-funded is successful, it will see the school open the door to non fee-paying students from September.

QEGS, was founded in 1509 and given its royal charter nearly 60 years later by Queen Elizabeth I. Fees charged have been more than £10,000 a year and pupil numbers fell from a high of 1,200 in 1997 to 478 in 2012.

As a free school, QEGS will still be able to set its own extended curriculum, term dates and length of school day.

Comments (12)

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9:21pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Read all about it ..... says...

How many of the parents/carers of the new intake think that the 'Private Education' standard will remain?
I am also interested to know how many of the teachers are fully qualified with a wealth of experience in relation to newly qualified on a fraction of the salary?
How many of the parents/carers of the new intake think that the 'Private Education' standard will remain? I am also interested to know how many of the teachers are fully qualified with a wealth of experience in relation to newly qualified on a fraction of the salary? Read all about it .....
  • Score: 8

10:23pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Manuel Hung says...

Once a very good school that is now slipping down the league tables for several reasons which is reflected in the number of pupils attending. Let's face it if you are going to be forking out 10k a year plus the rest to send your child to school you wouldn't choose one in the middle of Blackburn.

I don't see the numbers at Bolton Grammar School or Stoneyhurst being affected because their results are much better.

Anyone who believes that sending their child here will do any better after it is opened up to everyone is mistaken. Once the PC brigade have concluded the 'fair banding process' it will be just like every other school only staffed by teachers who don't know how to handle disruptive kids.
Once a very good school that is now slipping down the league tables for several reasons which is reflected in the number of pupils attending. Let's face it if you are going to be forking out 10k a year plus the rest to send your child to school you wouldn't choose one in the middle of Blackburn. I don't see the numbers at Bolton Grammar School or Stoneyhurst being affected because their results are much better. Anyone who believes that sending their child here will do any better after it is opened up to everyone is mistaken. Once the PC brigade have concluded the 'fair banding process' it will be just like every other school only staffed by teachers who don't know how to handle disruptive kids. Manuel Hung
  • Score: 0

10:30pm Wed 5 Feb 14

M.DANNY says...

More places needed for the disadvantaged kids ie kids from single parents and low income families.
Good education for all but QEGS was always for the rich and few elites not the many disadvantaged kids and kids from the ethnic minorities.
More places needed for the disadvantaged kids ie kids from single parents and low income families. Good education for all but QEGS was always for the rich and few elites not the many disadvantaged kids and kids from the ethnic minorities. M.DANNY
  • Score: -5

11:28pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Morag23 says...

What you all seem to forget is that the entrance exams still remain , so the school will keep good standards no matter if free or fee paying.
What you all seem to forget is that the entrance exams still remain , so the school will keep good standards no matter if free or fee paying. Morag23
  • Score: 8

11:40pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Morag23 says...

Read all about it ..... wrote:
How many of the parents/carers of the new intake think that the 'Private Education' standard will remain?
I am also interested to know how many of the teachers are fully qualified with a wealth of experience in relation to newly qualified on a fraction of the salary?
All of the teachers have extensive experience and of a very high standard. The only thing that's set to change is that teaching fees are not going to be charged.
And what is wrong with a private education? At least the children from private school will be able to read and write by the age of 11.
[quote][p][bold]Read all about it .....[/bold] wrote: How many of the parents/carers of the new intake think that the 'Private Education' standard will remain? I am also interested to know how many of the teachers are fully qualified with a wealth of experience in relation to newly qualified on a fraction of the salary?[/p][/quote]All of the teachers have extensive experience and of a very high standard. The only thing that's set to change is that teaching fees are not going to be charged. And what is wrong with a private education? At least the children from private school will be able to read and write by the age of 11. Morag23
  • Score: 11

6:51am Thu 6 Feb 14

woolywords says...

M.DANNY wrote:
More places needed for the disadvantaged kids ie kids from single parents and low income families.
Good education for all but QEGS was always for the rich and few elites not the many disadvantaged kids and kids from the ethnic minorities.
Parents don't mind the fees at this school, as it gives them a sense of pride to be able to say to others that their little Jane or Johnny attends, as if it shows that they will be better educated than they were.
Heaven forfend that same parent should become aware of the true meaning of the wording emblazoned on the school badge or they'll have an heart attack. Many think that Latin word, 'Liberae' means library but it doesn't...
[quote][p][bold]M.DANNY[/bold] wrote: More places needed for the disadvantaged kids ie kids from single parents and low income families. Good education for all but QEGS was always for the rich and few elites not the many disadvantaged kids and kids from the ethnic minorities.[/p][/quote]Parents don't mind the fees at this school, as it gives them a sense of pride to be able to say to others that their little Jane or Johnny attends, as if it shows that they will be better educated than they were. Heaven forfend that same parent should become aware of the true meaning of the wording emblazoned on the school badge or they'll have an heart attack. Many think that Latin word, 'Liberae' means library but it doesn't... woolywords
  • Score: 2

8:01am Thu 6 Feb 14

Excluded again says...

For more than four centuries, QEGS survived on fee paying parents. As soon as it cannot raise enough money form parents to keep going, it comes to the taxpayer for a bailout.

I assume QEGS will now be teaching how the public sector is necessary to step in when the private sector messes up and the taxpayer will pick up the tab - as so often seems to be the case this day.
For more than four centuries, QEGS survived on fee paying parents. As soon as it cannot raise enough money form parents to keep going, it comes to the taxpayer for a bailout. I assume QEGS will now be teaching how the public sector is necessary to step in when the private sector messes up and the taxpayer will pick up the tab - as so often seems to be the case this day. Excluded again
  • Score: 7

12:36pm Thu 6 Feb 14

zabby says...

This is the beginning of the end,it's just another form of social engineering and forced integration ,just watch the future of this once great school sink to the levels of the state schools,when fee paying parents invest their hard earned money into other schools
This is the beginning of the end,it's just another form of social engineering and forced integration ,just watch the future of this once great school sink to the levels of the state schools,when fee paying parents invest their hard earned money into other schools zabby
  • Score: 0

2:19pm Thu 6 Feb 14

Ladysadie says...

Under the old headmaster full scholarships were available to bright kids who couldn't afford the fees but under the new headmaster these scholarships were significantly reduced. Maybe this is part of the reason attendance dropped so dramatically.
Under the old headmaster full scholarships were available to bright kids who couldn't afford the fees but under the new headmaster these scholarships were significantly reduced. Maybe this is part of the reason attendance dropped so dramatically. Ladysadie
  • Score: 5

10:38pm Thu 6 Feb 14

Read all about it ..... says...

Morag23 wrote:
Read all about it ..... wrote:
How many of the parents/carers of the new intake think that the 'Private Education' standard will remain?
I am also interested to know how many of the teachers are fully qualified with a wealth of experience in relation to newly qualified on a fraction of the salary?
All of the teachers have extensive experience and of a very high standard. The only thing that's set to change is that teaching fees are not going to be charged.
And what is wrong with a private education? At least the children from private school will be able to read and write by the age of 11.
I don't see anything at all wrong with private education but please let's not pretend that that is what QEGS will continue to be! The school has employed it's fair share of NQTs previously to keep staffing costs to a minimum however despite them still wanting to choose the 'cream of the crop' by keeping the entrance exam surely the school can no longer dis-count the children who don't necessarily meet the elite criteria?
[quote][p][bold]Morag23[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Read all about it .....[/bold] wrote: How many of the parents/carers of the new intake think that the 'Private Education' standard will remain? I am also interested to know how many of the teachers are fully qualified with a wealth of experience in relation to newly qualified on a fraction of the salary?[/p][/quote]All of the teachers have extensive experience and of a very high standard. The only thing that's set to change is that teaching fees are not going to be charged. And what is wrong with a private education? At least the children from private school will be able to read and write by the age of 11.[/p][/quote]I don't see anything at all wrong with private education but please let's not pretend that that is what QEGS will continue to be! The school has employed it's fair share of NQTs previously to keep staffing costs to a minimum however despite them still wanting to choose the 'cream of the crop' by keeping the entrance exam surely the school can no longer dis-count the children who don't necessarily meet the elite criteria? Read all about it .....
  • Score: 0

10:55pm Thu 6 Feb 14

Morag23 says...

Read all about it ..... wrote:
Morag23 wrote:
Read all about it ..... wrote:
How many of the parents/carers of the new intake think that the 'Private Education' standard will remain?
I am also interested to know how many of the teachers are fully qualified with a wealth of experience in relation to newly qualified on a fraction of the salary?
All of the teachers have extensive experience and of a very high standard. The only thing that's set to change is that teaching fees are not going to be charged.
And what is wrong with a private education? At least the children from private school will be able to read and write by the age of 11.
I don't see anything at all wrong with private education but please let's not pretend that that is what QEGS will continue to be! The school has employed it's fair share of NQTs previously to keep staffing costs to a minimum however despite them still wanting to choose the 'cream of the crop' by keeping the entrance exam surely the school can no longer dis-count the children who don't necessarily meet the elite criteria?
I'm sure they can when 300plus kids take the entrance exam for next sept year 7 when only 85 places available.
[quote][p][bold]Read all about it .....[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morag23[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Read all about it .....[/bold] wrote: How many of the parents/carers of the new intake think that the 'Private Education' standard will remain? I am also interested to know how many of the teachers are fully qualified with a wealth of experience in relation to newly qualified on a fraction of the salary?[/p][/quote]All of the teachers have extensive experience and of a very high standard. The only thing that's set to change is that teaching fees are not going to be charged. And what is wrong with a private education? At least the children from private school will be able to read and write by the age of 11.[/p][/quote]I don't see anything at all wrong with private education but please let's not pretend that that is what QEGS will continue to be! The school has employed it's fair share of NQTs previously to keep staffing costs to a minimum however despite them still wanting to choose the 'cream of the crop' by keeping the entrance exam surely the school can no longer dis-count the children who don't necessarily meet the elite criteria?[/p][/quote]I'm sure they can when 300plus kids take the entrance exam for next sept year 7 when only 85 places available. Morag23
  • Score: 0

11:30pm Thu 6 Feb 14

Graham Hartley says...

Can the number of pupils grow so rapidly, given that they must pass the entrance examination? Perhaps so; the performance shown in public examinations has increased year-upon-year. The standard of the entrance examination might also have moved. How would we know?
Can the number of pupils grow so rapidly, given that they must pass the entrance examination? Perhaps so; the performance shown in public examinations has increased year-upon-year. The standard of the entrance examination might also have moved. How would we know? Graham Hartley
  • Score: 0

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