'Serious weaknesses' found at Hameldon College

This Is Lancashire: Headteacher Gill Broom says problems at Hameldon College are being addressed Headteacher Gill Broom says problems at Hameldon College are being addressed

STAFF and governors at an embattled Burnley ‘super school’ have been told that it has ‘serious weaknesses’ and teaching standards require improvement.

But Hameldon College headteacher Gill Broom insists they are already taking ‘decisive action’ in response to a list of nine major faults identified by the education watchdog Ofsted.

An inspection conducted near the end of October has placed the Coal Clough Lane school has rated Hameldon as ‘inadequate’ — the third time in six years failings have been uncovered there.

The school was placed in special measures in February 2007 and it was given a ‘notice to improve’ in July 2011.

Lead inspector Mark Patton’s verdict in 2013 is that student achievement is ‘inadequate’, as their maths skills are insufficiently developed and the most able students were not always being challenged.

He was also concerned about student behaviour and safety as student absence and exclusions were ‘too high’.

Mr Patton said: “Students’ achievement is inadequate because over time they do not make enough progress in mathematics. As a result, standards are not high enough in this key subject.”

Ms Broom is ‘disappointed’ with Ofsted’s findings, with the inspection team singling out some ‘outstanding’ teaching and acknowledging improving English results She said: “We’re already taking decisive action to tackle the issues identified by Ofsted, and the inspectors recognised this when they came to visit us.

“Their rating is a disappointment, of course, but it is a snapshot of the situation now – not how it will be in the near future.

“The governors and I are confident that we will improve the quality of the college's teaching, and indeed we're already seeing strong results.” The inspectors have said that the school needs to eliminate a ‘very small amount’ of inadequate teaching in maths and improve overall standards.

And staff have been asked to tackle truancy and unruly behaviour by drawing up more engaging lesson plans and working more closely with parents.

The school, formed in 2006 which opened with a reduced capacity of 750, now has around 340 students.

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2:02pm Thu 5 Dec 13

Stone Island: says...

Judging by some of the posters that come on these pages, particularly the sports section, there definitely appears to be an education problem in Burnley.
Judging by some of the posters that come on these pages, particularly the sports section, there definitely appears to be an education problem in Burnley. Stone Island:

3:24pm Thu 5 Dec 13

AlifromIsrael says...

Let's face it.

If you are thick, you will be thick.
The problem if you go to this school, is that you will still be thick when you leave.
And compared with the kids in South East Asia and China, you have no chance anyway.
Let's face it. If you are thick, you will be thick. The problem if you go to this school, is that you will still be thick when you leave. And compared with the kids in South East Asia and China, you have no chance anyway. AlifromIsrael

3:55pm Thu 5 Dec 13

DaveBurnley says...

Stone Island: wrote:
Judging by some of the posters that come on these pages, particularly the sports section, there definitely appears to be an education problem in Burnley.
Be careful when you point the finger Stone Island. You are articulate and post some excellent items, on the other hand Blackburn has a fine selection when it comes to the dumb poster stakes.
[quote][p][bold]Stone Island:[/bold] wrote: Judging by some of the posters that come on these pages, particularly the sports section, there definitely appears to be an education problem in Burnley.[/p][/quote]Be careful when you point the finger Stone Island. You are articulate and post some excellent items, on the other hand Blackburn has a fine selection when it comes to the dumb poster stakes. DaveBurnley

6:27pm Thu 5 Dec 13

Legal Beagle says...

Let's face it, it's not just Burnley or Blackburn, most of East Lancashire is nowadays significantly under-educated compared to the population as a whole, and this is just part of the general steady decline that the area faces.

Most of the towns in East Lancashire are, like many other former industrial areas, well past their sell-by date. Its inhabitants have always been predominantly working class, but whereas that used to be a proud culture that valued hard work and education the work that sustained people has now disappeared, and the ethics have gone with it.

In its place is either employment by the state of one sort or another or a life spent on benefits. The traditional values of self-reliance, community and neighbourliness have gradually disappeared leaving huge numbers of people adrift and with little hope of any improvement in their life.

The situation's becoming worse with the minority of children that do receive a really good education often heading south - and who can blame them? If you're 21 with a good degree from a good university the prospects of earning a good living and bringing your children up in a comfortable and prosperous environment are sadly rather greater in Aylesbury than they are in Accrington.

It really is a great shame. The northern industrial towns used to be proud places with a lot of self-confidence - one only has to look at some of the fine buildings and parks that the Victorians produced. But nowadays many of the towns are like the majority of their inhabitants - existing on handouts from their southern neighbours. Their knowledge of this only adds to the general depressed air that many of them exude, and which makes them unattractive places to live and work. With a few notable exceptions it's really quite difficult to imagine how anyone who could afford to live in London or the south of England could nowadays be attracted to live in a northern town.

This isn't the fault of the people who live here, most of whom are perfectly decent, hard-working people. They're just a victim of economic forces, like the car workers of Detroit. But it's hard to see how the trend is ever going to be reversed, particularly now that young people are so mobile and family ties are so much looser.

Still, I suppose there's always fracking to save the day!
Let's face it, it's not just Burnley or Blackburn, most of East Lancashire is nowadays significantly under-educated compared to the population as a whole, and this is just part of the general steady decline that the area faces. Most of the towns in East Lancashire are, like many other former industrial areas, well past their sell-by date. Its inhabitants have always been predominantly working class, but whereas that used to be a proud culture that valued hard work and education the work that sustained people has now disappeared, and the ethics have gone with it. In its place is either employment by the state of one sort or another or a life spent on benefits. The traditional values of self-reliance, community and neighbourliness have gradually disappeared leaving huge numbers of people adrift and with little hope of any improvement in their life. The situation's becoming worse with the minority of children that do receive a really good education often heading south - and who can blame them? If you're 21 with a good degree from a good university the prospects of earning a good living and bringing your children up in a comfortable and prosperous environment are sadly rather greater in Aylesbury than they are in Accrington. It really is a great shame. The northern industrial towns used to be proud places with a lot of self-confidence - one only has to look at some of the fine buildings and parks that the Victorians produced. But nowadays many of the towns are like the majority of their inhabitants - existing on handouts from their southern neighbours. Their knowledge of this only adds to the general depressed air that many of them exude, and which makes them unattractive places to live and work. With a few notable exceptions it's really quite difficult to imagine how anyone who could afford to live in London or the south of England could nowadays be attracted to live in a northern town. This isn't the fault of the people who live here, most of whom are perfectly decent, hard-working people. They're just a victim of economic forces, like the car workers of Detroit. But it's hard to see how the trend is ever going to be reversed, particularly now that young people are so mobile and family ties are so much looser. Still, I suppose there's always fracking to save the day! Legal Beagle

7:39pm Thu 5 Dec 13

AlifromIsrael says...

Or go and live in China and get a decent education and a bowl of rice everyday. Then you will get a job.
Or go and live in China and get a decent education and a bowl of rice everyday. Then you will get a job. AlifromIsrael

9:31am Fri 6 Dec 13

Jack Wallhurst says...

"The "school" formed in 2006" - the building in the photo was built as Burnley Grammar School a >400 year old institution. It used to have serious teachers teaching serious subjects to serious pupils and achieved great success.
Somewhere around 1980 it became comprehensive and so began its intentional slide into tthe abyss. Sad and depressing but consistent with Burnley's decline from proud and vibrant town to wasteland.
The mismanagement of UKplc since WWII is criminal.
"The "school" formed in 2006" - the building in the photo was built as Burnley Grammar School a >400 year old institution. It used to have serious teachers teaching serious subjects to serious pupils and achieved great success. Somewhere around 1980 it became comprehensive and so began its intentional slide into tthe abyss. Sad and depressing but consistent with Burnley's decline from proud and vibrant town to wasteland. The mismanagement of UKplc since WWII is criminal. Jack Wallhurst

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